Rigid Raider 19 Modifications and Rebuild

Repair or modification of Boston Whaler boats, their engines, trailers, and gear
AbeToor
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Joined: Thu Oct 12, 2017 4:48 pm

Rigid Raider 19 Modifications and Rebuild

Postby AbeToor » Thu Oct 12, 2017 7:09 pm

Hello all. I just acquired a stock 1989 Rigid Raider 19 after it sat out in a field for 18 years--tearful.

For those unfamiliar, she this 1989 Rigid Raider 19 has twin OMC 70 two-stroke-power-cycle engine strokes with electric trim, hydraulic steering, hull-mounted fuel filters, four huge inboard [lifting points], a raised flat deck with zero storage, and (what I believe is) a 56-gallon fuel tank.

This hull was designed for one purpose only, and it was NOT sunsets with a lounging vixen and an exotic assortment of cheeses and wines.

Before even considering any restoration and because she'd been out to pasture since big-hair days, I [removed] the fuel tank and dug a few test sites down to the hull checking for water intrusion. Fortunately, minimal moisture was found, and the tank and structural foam--from what I can tell--are good. I am preparing to heal the foam and glass, and I'm sending the tank to a radiator shop to air test and clean.

The deck was designed for eight marines seated forward of the stern-favored console. I intend to use her for offshore fishing and crabbing. I'd like to relocate the console forward of stock position about four feet. I want to open the aft console deck area, and I hope moving the console, batteries, oil mixing tank ,and [helmsman] forward may help prevent the hull from riding at 80-degrees when the bow is empty.

I have a few other modifications in mind to get her more functional and family friendly.

Though I have a decent amount of experience commercial fishing in small craft off Kodiak, the most work I’ve ever done to a boat is etching my name in the deck after losing a hard night's catch at the bar, so I welcome any input on this adventure.

Is there a rule of thumb for the console position on this hull?

Loosely I’m matching the console layout of an Outrage 19, although the hull design and weights of the two models are altogether different. The Raider has a massive fiberglass keel, very thick hull, and a huge bulkhead of foam in the bow which probably helps keep the bow down. I guess that at commercial specification the boat trimmed fine without troops, but still seems prudent to move the [helmsman] closer to or forward center. Any advice on relocation of console is appreciated.

The stock rigging ran top deck under a 24-inch wire-mold between a stern well drain hole and the console. I’d like to run all that spaghetti under the tank cover through 1.5” PVC if possible, thinking a 45 bend on each end with a small drain inside to get water from the PVC pipe to the sub deck drain trough. At the stern well side it would likely need two 45deg bends at opposite positions to properly feed rigging back to motors. Does anyone know max bend radius of throttle cables?

There are three 4-inch diameter hull drains in the transom that all had one-way flappers on them back in the day. Hogs ate em. The only thing I've found as possible replacements are exhaust flappers. Any suggestions or advice with replacing these?

I'm considering the installation of a bow pulpit to keep the anchor outside the hull, no bow storage. Can anyone suggest a good retrofit model?

I will eventually install a Bow Rail. I have access to a lot of 1-1/4-inch 6360T6 aluminum tubing. Any [advice on] bow rail fabrication. On the advantages of particular material types?

Thank you--Abe

jimh
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Re: Rigid Raider 19 Modifications and Rebuild

Postby jimh » Fri Oct 13, 2017 8:13 am

ABE--what are "four huge inboard pick anchors"?

What is "the bosun" you plan to move? Did the boat come with some old NCO that won't give up the ship?

Regarding the smallest bend radius allowed for a mechanical shift-throttle cable, this varies with the particular brand and model. The more expensive and better working cables probably tolerate smaller bend radius better. Obtain the manufacturer's literature and you should be able to find the specification.

jimh
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Re: Rigid Raider 19 Modifications and Rebuild

Postby jimh » Fri Oct 13, 2017 8:22 am

Re making an anchor bow pulpit, I have seen several made from laminated teak lumber. But that look might not be appropriate on a RAIDER.

Jefecinco
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Re: Rigid Raider 19 Modifications and Rebuild

Postby Jefecinco » Fri Oct 13, 2017 9:43 am

I'm not familiar with aluminum bow rails. What I've seen were steel, usually stainless, but 1 1/4 inch aluminum tubing should be stout enough. Will the large tubing allow a stanchion base small enough to be secured to the gunnel? I expect you'll want three or four screws to mount each stanchion. If the bow rail is intended to keep people from falling overboard it will need to be taller than if designed more for use as a handhold. For a fishing boat I tend to favor lower "grab" type bow rails. If you mount a bow pulpit you can design the bow rail to be much higher at the pulpit to provide a secure railing for anchor handling in rough conditions. You may also want to incorporate a power for the pulpit for deep water anchoring.
Butch

jimh
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Re: Rigid Raider 19 Modifications and Rebuild

Postby jimh » Fri Oct 13, 2017 10:12 am

Aluminum is not as strong as steel. Aluminum is usually used when weight must be saved. In the instance of a bow railing, I would expect that construction with steel would be preferred due to the greater strength, and aluminum would not have such lower weight that it would be advantageous. I have seen some aluminum rails but they are usually rather large diameter. I suspect, however, that in the case of a bow railing, the weakest part of the structure will be the point of attachment to the hull, unless you can through-bolt the stanchion bases with big backing plates. If anyone really heaved on the railing, I would expect the base might let go before the tubing bends, unless the force is applied halfway between stanchions and in a direction that tends to cause compression of the stanchion instead of a turning moment on the stanchion.

AbeToor
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Joined: Thu Oct 12, 2017 4:48 pm

Re: Rigid Raider 19 Modifications and Rebuild

Postby AbeToor » Fri Oct 13, 2017 10:42 am

Thanks for input on alum vs steel, agree the biggest concern is the stanchions. Planning to cut and glass in several anchor bases.

Still undecided about the bow pulpit, good input, thank you.

The four "pick anchors" are rigging points to crane the boat. They're bolted through the gunnels and have to weight 5lbs each. [Changed "pick anchors" to "lifting points" to better describe them in the initial article--jimh]

Bosun's the fat dude at the console. [Changed "bosun" to "helmsman" to better describe the reference as being to a person in the initial article--jimh]

jimh
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Re: Rigid Raider 19 Modifications and Rebuild

Postby jimh » Fri Oct 13, 2017 11:32 am

Also re aluminum bow railings: they are common on aluminum hulls, where you can weld them to the hull. There could also be concerns about dissimilar metals and galvanic corrosion with aluminum and steel meeting, so aluminum may be preferred with an aluminum hull. But I believe this RIGID RAIDER 19 hull is fiberglass, isn't it?

AbeToor
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Re: Rigid Raider 19 Modifications and Rebuild

Postby AbeToor » Fri Oct 13, 2017 12:16 pm

Yes, hull is foam filled fiberglass. From a welder's perspective, stainless steel and aluminum are a pretty similar--a pain weld--although aluminum may be easier to form. Considering overall strength I'll probably [use stainless steel to make the railings].