1988 REVENGE 22 Engine Hours and Re-power

A conversation among Whalers
uprightbob
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Aug 12, 2019 11:34 am

1988 REVENGE 22 Engine Hours and Re-power

Postby uprightbob » Mon Aug 12, 2019 11:40 am

First post here. A recent move to a water community on the Chesapeake Bay has us interested in getting a boat, which would be our very first boat. Currently we're looking at a 1988 Revenge 22 W-T that appears to be in good condition. This REVENGE 22 W-T is powered by twin Johnson 115-HP Ocean Pro outboards with only 260 hours each. It has a nice bimini and weather canvas enclosure, as well as a full boat cover. For electronics it has a VHF Marine Band radio and a Garmin Chart plotter. The dock hand said one of the engine sputters. The boat doesn't have [the optional Whaler Drive]; the engines are mounted on the transom.

With 260 hours on twin engines, am I looking at a re-power soon?

Thanks in advance.

biggiefl
Posts: 275
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 1:31 pm
Location: south Tampa Bay area
Contact:

Re: Possible Revenge 22 as very first boat

Postby biggiefl » Mon Aug 12, 2019 12:21 pm

Low hours is not always a good sign as outboards like to be used frequently to keep everything in balance. With that said a motor can die when it is brand new or after being abused for decades and thousands of hours. I don't know what "sputters" means but I would want a full diagnosis on condition.

Lastly a 22-foot boat is decent size and twin engines are sometimes referred to as twin headaches. Are you sure you want to start out with a boat this size and age?

Most start out in the 17-foot, get used to boating, and move up in a couple years.
On my 24th Whaler. Currently in the stable: 86 18' Outrage, 81 13' Sport(original owner), 87 11' Sport, 69 Squall. :roll:

jimh
Posts: 6894
Joined: Fri Oct 09, 2015 12:25 pm
Location: Michigan, Lower Peninsula
Contact:

Re: Engine Hours and Repower

Postby jimh » Tue Aug 13, 2019 7:12 am

Classic outboard two-stroke-power-cycle engines with carburetors can run for thousands of hours, if properly maintained and run on clean fuel and good lubricants.

Engines from 1988 with only 260-hours have not been run very much, but they are 31-years old. They will very likely need some work.

biggiefl
Posts: 275
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 1:31 pm
Location: south Tampa Bay area
Contact:

Re: 1988 REVENGE 22 Engine Hours and Repower

Postby biggiefl » Tue Aug 13, 2019 9:43 am

Ocean Pros came out in 1993 I believe, so it has been re-powered. They are a Looper engine instead of the crossflow design they replaced so more efficient. But you are probably looking at 12-to 14-GPH at cruise—which is not much more than my 225 Ocean Runner burned. You can read Jim's log on his 22 with a 225 E-TEC to get an idea of gas savings and performance.
On my 24th Whaler. Currently in the stable: 86 18' Outrage, 81 13' Sport(original owner), 87 11' Sport, 69 Squall. :roll:

Jefecinco
Posts: 993
Joined: Fri Oct 09, 2015 6:35 pm
Location: Gulf Shores, AL

Re: 1988 REVENGE 22 Engine Hours and Repower

Postby Jefecinco » Tue Aug 13, 2019 9:54 am

When buying a boat with old engines it's always a good idea to keep a repower in mind and to perhaps begin to periodically set aside a few dollars for the eventuality regardless of the hours on the hour meters. I would not trust the hour meter readings on a used boat as they are sometimes changed.

Low engine hours on the meters are indicative of infrequent use of an engine with several years on the transom. As stated above, that is not necessarily a bad thing. Before buying a boat with used engines I would have an engine survey performed by a qualified technician as part of the overall pre-purchase survey.
Butch

uprightbob
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Aug 12, 2019 11:34 am

Re: 1988 REVENGE 22 Engine Hours and Repower

Postby uprightbob » Tue Aug 13, 2019 11:21 am

Thank you everyone that has responded. A little research resulted in discovering the engines are from the year 2000. So yes, socking away a few dollars every year seems to be a good plan. I like the idea of a single engine for the next re-power. I plan on having a few local seasoned boat owners give the craft a good lookover before I commit to a survey.

jimh
Posts: 6894
Joined: Fri Oct 09, 2015 12:25 pm
Location: Michigan, Lower Peninsula
Contact:

Re: 1988 REVENGE 22 Engine Hours and Repower

Postby jimh » Sat Aug 17, 2019 6:55 am

Engines from c.2000 are 12-years-newer than 1988 models. They may have the improved OIS-2000 ignition system.

roundle1979
Posts: 33
Joined: Thu Jun 13, 2019 11:10 am

Re: 1988 REVENGE 22 Engine Hours and Repower

Postby roundle1979 » Sat Aug 17, 2019 7:19 am

How much are they asking?

Prior to buying my 2004 Nantucket 190, I nearly bought this one: http://whalerrevenge.com/

I am glad I [ultimately bought] an open, center console boat.

jimh
Posts: 6894
Joined: Fri Oct 09, 2015 12:25 pm
Location: Michigan, Lower Peninsula
Contact:

Re: 1988 REVENGE 22 Engine Hours and Repower

Postby jimh » Sat Aug 17, 2019 9:41 am

I am glad I bought two REVENGE boats, but I am not sure how that helps to assess the need for a re-power for twin OMC 2000 115-HP V4 engines with low hours. How long those engines will run will not be affected by my purchase of a different boat or boats.

jimh
Posts: 6894
Joined: Fri Oct 09, 2015 12:25 pm
Location: Michigan, Lower Peninsula
Contact:

Re: 1988 REVENGE 22 Engine Hours and Repower

Postby jimh » Sat Aug 17, 2019 9:47 am

uprightbob wrote:...I like the idea of a single engine for the next re-power.


For a relatively light weight 22-foot moderate V-hull boat like the classic Bob Dougherty Boston Whaler REVENGE 22, a single engine is very suitable. Modern outboard engines are very reliable. A REVENGE 22 with a single 200-HP engine will be able to reach boat speeds above 40-MPH. The wind and wave conditions likely will seldom permit an enjoyable ride at those speeds unless there are exceptionally low winds and calm seas.

Maneuvering with a single engine will be easy and under control. Coming from a sailboat—as I did—you will have to learn new techniques for slow speed boat handling at docks and piers. A shallow-draft outboard-engine-powered boat without a deep keel behaves quite differently at low speeds than a typical sailboat with a large rudder.