1963 13-footer Restoration

Repair or modification of Boston Whaler boats, their engines, trailers, and gear
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opencage
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1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby opencage » Wed Jun 26, 2019 9:37 pm

I bought 1963 Boston Whaler 13-footer with a trailer, and engine.

The trailer seems a little newer but not much .

The engine is a c.1985 Nissan 40-HP two-cylinder two-stroke-power-cycle engine.

I got to take out the boat a few times and was hoping to enjoy it for a season before I restored it. Then I realized that one of the leaf spring hangers broke off the trailer frame and figured I oughta repair the trailer before I moved from Colorado to Michigan.

1a.jpg
Fig. 1. Top: bought condition, bottom: interior and rub rail insert removed
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I stripped the hull bare, winterized the outboard, then disassembled the trailer. I cut off the other hangers and ground off the rust added bolt-on hangers and replaced the double-eye springs with some slippers. Also used Phospho and Rustoleum primer and paint along with new hub assemblies. I was worried, but it made the 1200 mile trip

2a.jpg
Fig. 2. Stored for winter upside down on blocks and covered
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3a.jpg
Fig. 3. Began to disassemble the trailer to replace hangers, remove rust and repaint
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Last edited by opencage on Fri Jul 05, 2019 4:12 am, edited 4 times in total.

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Re: 1963 13 Restoration

Postby opencage » Wed Jun 26, 2019 9:38 pm

4a.jpg
Fig. 4 Angle-grinder-ed everything to remove rust, then Phospo-ed, primed, and painted with white flat Rustoleum.
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5a.jpg
Fig. 5. Re-assembled with new hardware, bolt-on hangers, and slipper leaf springs
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6a.jpg
Fig. 6. Ready to make the trip halfway across the country
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Last edited by opencage on Fri Jul 05, 2019 7:41 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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Re: 1963 13 Restoration

Postby opencage » Wed Jun 26, 2019 9:47 pm

I sold the older Nissan 40HP 2-stroke before we left Colorado. I got the go-ahead from my wife to buy a new motor that "doesn't stink".

I'm staying at my parents' place and they have a pole-barn and I'm now stripping the bottom paint and topside paint that was put on the hull back in the 1980's. I'm having a lot of success with Citri-Strip. But for me, letting it sit over night with plastic on it wasn't as effective as just letting it set an hour or so and then scraping. The gel stayed "wet" and was much easier to scrape and seemed to take off as much paint. When I left it over night with plastic covering it, it still dried quite a bit, was hard to scrape, and I had to reapply the Citri-Strip in many places to be able to scrape.

7a.jpg
Fig. 7. In my dad's pole barn, getting covered in paint stripper
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8a.jpg
Fig. 8. The first night after stripping, the transom and aft white sections were just sanded, the rest were stripped with citric-strip
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9a.jpg
Fig. 9. Most of the bottom paint is gone
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After finishing stripping, the next steps are epoxying/relaminating some soft spots, some small fiberglass repairs, then fairing. Oh yeah, and I gotta fix that bow eye hole too.

Then on to re-gel coating and likely a Suzuki 30HP 4-stroke, I have a couple of other posts asking about these specifically:

Gelcoat (and sudden gelcoat creases): http://continuouswave.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=4324

Repower: http://continuouswave.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=4448
Last edited by opencage on Fri Jul 05, 2019 7:52 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby opencage » Thu Jul 04, 2019 7:59 am

Stripping is basically done. I understand why folks say just pay for soda-blasting. I know it doesn't look like much else got done, but trust me it's better. It was tough getting the paint out of the trough under the lip/rub rail area.

10a.jpg
Fig. 10. Finishing stripping, there was a white topside paint on top of the off-white gelcoat
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11a.jpg
Fig. 11. Removing the residue and remaining bluegreen color of the old bottom paint
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12a.jpg
Fig. 12. Ready for sanding
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Last edited by opencage on Fri Jul 05, 2019 8:12 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby jimh » Thu Jul 04, 2019 8:26 am

Please go back and edit all your posts to provide captions for the 12 illustrations.

You are going to have a lot of sweat-equity in this boat.

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby dg22 » Fri Jul 05, 2019 4:35 pm

Great job! From the pics, the bottom looks to be in good condition. My 1967 13-footer had a lot more blistering which I sanded out and then applied 2 coats of Inter-protect, filled the imperfections with Watertite, a 2-part epoxy marine filler, then a few more coats of Inter-protect and then 2 coats of bottom paint. All the best with your project.

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby opencage » Fri Jul 05, 2019 8:19 pm

Jim, added the captions. I agree about the sweat equity: learning a lot; enjoy working with my Dad on a boat my Son will use someday, too.

dg22, thanks. I am very surprised at how good the gelcoat is. There is really almost no blistering. Only three delamination spots that aren't too big and don't concern me (yet). There were some repairs under that bottom paint so still plenty of dremel-ing and epoxy and fiberglass work ahead of me, but nothing that really scares me.

Like anything, it's just hard getting the time.

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby opencage » Sun Sep 29, 2019 9:29 am

I'm still working on this.

Life happens. Found and bought a house, moved again, futzed around with generic new house stuff, started a new job, got the school year started (I'm an elementary school teacher), then finally got the boat up to the new house's garage. The garage is insulated and heated, so I'm looking forward to being able to work on it throughout the winter, the goal is definitely have it done by next season.

IMG_0040.jpg
Fig. 13. Dremel tool used on cracks.
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IMG_0039.jpg
Fig. 14. I used a Dremel tool on gunwale edge that will be under the rub rail; it was good practice.
IMG_0039.jpg (5.61 KiB) Viewed 11738 times
Last edited by opencage on Sun Sep 29, 2019 9:38 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby opencage » Sun Sep 29, 2019 9:37 am

In the new garage, ready for more work.

Big things left for the bottom of the hull:
- finish the cracks (dremel, fill ((west 105 + 206)), fair/sand)
- fix three delimitation spots (west 105 + 206) using sand bags for bottom of hull and 1x8's and clamps for hull wall
- fix the bigger "dings" using the west system instructions for minor fiberglass repair
- sand the old gelcoat one more time and re-gelcoat with FGCI's crushable gelcoat

Then flip it over and repeat for the cockpit. I will try to do my best to photo and document as much as possible. I know I'm more confident doing this stuff because others have done that.

IMG_0361.jpg
Fig. 15. Bottom hull at bow.
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0360.jpg
Fig. 16. Hull
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IMG_0359.jpg
Fig. 17. Port side
IMG_0359.jpg (4.01 KiB) Viewed 11735 times

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby Masbama » Sun Sep 29, 2019 10:55 am

Looking good.
Question: Does the boat rest entirely on the keel rollers? I see no bunks in the pictures.
If so, that may be the cause of the keel rash seen in the pictures.

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby opencage » Sun Sep 29, 2019 12:40 pm

Masbama wrote:Looking good.
Question: Does the boat rest entirely on the keel rollers? I see no bunks in the pictures.
If so, that may be the cause of the keel rash seen in the pictures.


Thanks! I know it's far from finished but I'm happy with what's done so far.

Here's the finished trailer with bunks. But those are really only for lateral support. I used the trailer article: http://continuouswave.com/whaler/reference/trailering/trailer.html to set it up. From everything I've read and understand, the keel is meant to hold most of the weight.

But I do plan on reinforcing the center keel with some glasswork and making sure the gelcoat there isn't thin (but also not too thick, I have a wet mil gauge for the application), still debating the keelguard or not when finished, I know I'd prefer to not have it. And doing the FGCI gelcoat will let me relatively easily repair and gelcoat dings.

IMG_0282.jpg
Fig. 18. Restored trailer for 1963 13-footer.
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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby Masbama » Sun Sep 29, 2019 3:08 pm

Interesting!
Why would the FGCI gelcoat be easier to use and repair as opposed to other brands of gelcoat?

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby opencage » Sun Sep 29, 2019 4:12 pm

Masbama wrote:Interesting!
Why would the FGCI gelcoat be easier to use and repair as opposed to other brands of gelcoat?


Ah, good clarifying question.

I just mean that since the gelcoat will be new and of a generic color from this supplier, it'll be easier to buy and color match, than having to do so with older oxidized gelcoat using Spectrum for example.

Other than that I don't see it being easier other than that it's supposed to flow and even out better--like paint--and require less sanding, per the manufacturer. I don't have experience yet.

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby Bayou Bum » Sun Sep 29, 2019 7:24 pm

Redoing a 13' myself. Are you going to use any primer or undercoat for the brush on gel coat ?
I originally planed to use an epoxy barrier undercoat before using brush on gel coat, but now I'm thinking it's not going to add any real additional protection sitting in between gel coat and gel coat.

Your thoughts?
1963 13' Classic

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby opencage » Sun Sep 29, 2019 8:05 pm

Bayou Bum wrote:Redoing a 13' myself. Are you going to use any primer or undercoat for the brush on gel coat ?
I originally planed to use an epoxy barrier undercoat before using brush on gel coat, but now I'm thinking it's not going to add any real additional protection sitting in between gel coat and gel coat.

Your thoughts?



I asked that question specifically to FGCI. You can see my summary of my conversations here.

In response to that question, the tech said it wasn't necessary to add the epoxy barrier coat. Gelcoat doesn't fail that often. My situation is similar to yours I think in that 99% of the time it's on a trailer, but I might go on vacation somewhere for a week. He said it's just not worth it. Just be sure to follow the preparation procedure very well.

I have their white brushable gelcoat in my basement ready to go, just need to finish up the repairs first.

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby Bayou Bum » Sun Sep 29, 2019 8:21 pm

Got it, Thanks.
Good Luck and post up pics when you're done!
1963 13' Classic

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby rtk » Wed Oct 02, 2019 7:00 am

Nice work opencage!

Stripping is basically done. I understand why folks say just pay for soda-blasting. I know it doesn't look like much else got done, but trust me it's better. It was tough getting the paint out of the trough under the lip/rub rail area.


I can't agree with you more. After spending countless hours (I still have a long way to go) sanding and grinding my 1971 Outrage 21 project having the entire boat soda blasted would have been the smart choice. After soda blasting finish sanding is still necessary but it goes much easier and quicker. A rough estimate to do my boat was about $1,000. I've probably spent about $300 on sanding supplies/equipment. I had some time on my hands this spring and summer due to a voluntary separation from work so I figured I would just "have at it".

The prep work is not a pleasant activity but it is the most important part of the job. The heated garage is great to have for this type of project. Taking tarps off every time time I go to work on the boat is tedious.

Best of luck with the balance of the project.

Rich

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby opencage » Sun Oct 06, 2019 4:36 pm

rtk wrote:Nice work opencage!

Stripping is basically done. I understand why folks say just pay for soda-blasting. I know it doesn't look like much else got done, but trust me it's better. It was tough getting the paint out of the trough under the lip/rub rail area.


I can't agree with you more. After spending countless hours (I still have a long way to go) sanding and grinding my 1971 Outrage 21 project having the entire boat soda blasted would have been the smart choice. After soda blasting finish sanding is still necessary but it goes much easier and quicker. A rough estimate to do my boat was about $1,000. I've probably spent about $300 on sanding supplies/equipment. I had some time on my hands this spring and summer due to a voluntary separation from work so I figured I would just "have at it".

The prep work is not a pleasant activity but it is the most important part of the job. The heated garage is great to have for this type of project. Taking tarps off every time time I go to work on the boat is tedious.

Best of luck with the balance of the project.

Rich



Yeah, I'm not looking forward to doing the cockpit, but I'm hoping now that I know what I'm doing it'll go a bit faster. And it gives me a good idea of the hull condition and specific spots to hit for sure.

Thanks, I'll keep posting as I keep working. I've been fishing and golfing during my free time while the weather's still decent, but I know if I don't start soon, I might not be done by spring.

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby rtk » Mon Oct 07, 2019 6:48 am

I found that a Dremel Multi-Max with the detail sanding pad and a "mouse" type sander came in very handy in sanding the tight spots.

https://www.dremel.com/en_US/tools/-/su ... ti-purpose

I have a 1973 13' Whaler in the garage also that needs quite a bit of attention. That'll be my winter boredom avoidance project.

Enjoy!

Rich

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby jimh » Mon Oct 07, 2019 8:58 am

I do not see any difference between the work shown in Figs. 10, 11, and 12, and the work shown in Figs. 15, 16, and 17. What is the difference?

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby opencage » Mon Oct 07, 2019 8:20 pm

rtk wrote:I found that a Dremel Multi-Max with the detail sanding pad and a "mouse" type sander came in very handy in sanding the tight spots.

https://www.dremel.com/en_US/tools/-/su ... ti-purpose

I have a 1973 13' Whaler in the garage also that needs quite a bit of attention. That'll be my winter boredom avoidance project.

Enjoy!

Rich


Thanks for the info, I'll check it out. I've been using a Harbor Freight dremel-type for removing the gelcoat cracks and just wet-sanding by hand for any tight spots to make sure I don't do too much.

Good luck on yours!

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby opencage » Mon Oct 07, 2019 9:09 pm

jimh wrote:I do not see any difference between the work shown in Figs. 10, 11, and 12, and the work shown in Figs. 15, 16, and 17. What is the difference?


Ha, yeah, there's not a ton of difference, a little more stripping, sanding, and grinding out of the cracks. And in the new garage.

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby opencage » Wed Jan 29, 2020 9:49 pm

UPDATE after almost four months:

0877.jpg
Fig. 19. Hull bottom showing cracks enlarged with a DREMEL tool grinder and beveled open. Compare this view of the hull bottom with the view of the hull bottom seen in figures 7, 8, 9, 10 ,11, 12, 15, 16, and 17.
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I got all the bottom hull cracks widened [with a DREMEL tool]. I had to go over them twice to make sure they were beveled out per section 2.0 of the "West System Fiberglass Boat Repair & Maintenance" manual

https://www.westsystem.com/wp-content/uploads/Fiberglass-Manual-2015.pdf

Most of the cracks stop where the gelcoat layer meets the laminates. Some extend into the first laminate layer, but not into the woven roving. Again per the West manual, the cracks can be repaired with epoxy and 406 filler. A few spots will need some more fiberglass repair, but not that many and they aren't that big.

Next step is re-laminating some skin sections, again thanks to the West manual, section 5.1.2.

I wanted to double check with folks about the transom holes. They're all the way through the transom and I want to fill in the holes.

0876.jpg
Fig. 20. Holes in transom
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In the illustration above, the transom holes circled in blue have plywood reinforcement. For those I was thinking of gluing together a dowel of plywood. The red circled ones are a part of the usual foam sandwich. I know I shouldn't use a dowel here, so it can compress a bit. What can I use for the foam section? Leave it empty? Use something like Evercoat Sealant Foam Spray? Use soft pine--probably still not compressible enough?

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby jimh » Wed Jan 29, 2020 11:35 pm

When you fill the cracks with WEST System epoxy, be sure to use a low density filler so they can be sanded fair. The new epoxy will be much harder than the 57-year-old gel coat, and if there is not a filler, you will be sanding off old gel coat before you sand off new epoxy.

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby jimh » Thu Jan 30, 2020 9:27 am

Re the transom holes for the engine mounting (which are circled with blue in your illustration):

If the holes already in the transom are in the correct location (as per the BIA engine mounting layout described in the FAQ), you don't need to fill them with wood plugs. If the holes have enlarged to be bigger in diameter, you can fill the holes with epoxy and filler, and re-drill them. Some installers like to first seal the holes with raw epoxy to completely seal the wood. Then re-drill them. This creates an annulus or ring around the holes of epoxy-sealed wood.

If the holes already in the transom are NOT in the correct position, then you should fill them with a plug or bung made up of several plywood plugs cut with a hole saw or plug cutter. Glue the plugs or bungs into the existing holes. You can use epoxy or a good wood glue. Leave some depression at each end, then fill that with epoxy and re-top-coat with gel coat.

I can't tell with any certainty where the holes in the transom for engine mounting are located from your illustration. Check the dimensions against the BIA engine mounting template dimensions as described in the FAQ at

Q9: What is the Standard Transom Hole Layout?
http://continuouswave.com/whaler/reference/FAQ/#Q9

What does not look correct is the vertical spacing of the holes relative to the top of the transom. The BIA recommendation says:

BIA Recommendation wrote:The upper holes in the transom should be 1 and 7/8-inch below the top of the transom.


The upper holes in the transom now look like they are much farther away from the top of the transom than 1-7/8-inch.

The holes for the transom lifting eyes (which are circled with red in your illustration) should be handled in the same manner. There should be reinforcement wood in those locations, too.

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby opencage » Thu Jan 30, 2020 1:45 pm

jimh wrote:When you fill the cracks with WEST System epoxy, be sure to use a low density filler so they can be sanded fair. The new epoxy will be much harder than the 57-year-old gel coat, and if there is not a filler, you will be sanding off old gel coat before you sand off new epoxy.


Thanks Jim, definitely planning on using some kind of filler. I'm going to do some tests on some plywood to get an idea and some small sections of the gunwhale edge which be be under the rub rail anyway to see what works/sands best.

The West manual says, wet with pure epoxy, then go over with the 406 mixed in as this will still add some strength. I also have some 407 which is meant more as a fairing filler I may end up using. And a West Marine isn't far so I may grab some other stuff to test out too. Ultimately over everything, epoxy and gelcoat, will go a new gelcoat layer.

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby opencage » Thu Jan 30, 2020 1:50 pm

jimh wrote:Re the transom holes for the engine mounting (which are circled with blue in your illustration):

If the holes already in the transom are in the correct location (as per the BIA engine mounting layout described in the FAQ), you don't need to fill them with wood plugs. If the holes have enlarged to be bigger in diameter, you can fill the holes with epoxy and filler, and re-drill them. Some installers like to first seal the holes with raw epoxy to completely seal the wood. Then re-drill them. This creates an annulus or ring around the holes of epoxy-sealed wood.

If the holes already in the transom are NOT in the correct position, then you should fill them with a plug or bung made up of several plywood plugs cut with a hole saw or plug cutter. Glue the plugs or bungs into the existing holes. You can use epoxy or a good wood glue. Leave some depression at each end, then fill that with epoxy and re-top-coat with gel coat.


I'm going to use the Koski transom extension http://www.koskiboatworks.com/custom-whaler-accessories.html and put a new 20" shaft outboard on it, so they almost certainly will not be in the right spots. The "build a plywood plug" plan is exactly what I was thinking.

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby opencage » Thu Jan 30, 2020 1:56 pm

jimh wrote:The holes for the transom lifting eyes (which are circled with red in your illustration) should be handled in the same manner. There should be reinforcement wood in those locations, too.


Interesting, I was starting to really lean towards the Evercoat Sealant Foam Spray https://www.westmarine.com/buy/evercoat--sealant-foam-spray-12-oz--276659 to semi-match the rigidity/"compressiveness" of the original foam. There is no wood there now and the wood locating diagram doesn't show wood should be there. I plan on putting in transom lifting eyes from Specialty Marine in the "correct"/usual location at the top corners of the transom notch. Would you just use some sections of pine dowel then?

Thanks again.

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby jimh » Thu Jan 30, 2020 4:03 pm

Re the lack of wood for the outer parts of the transom: I forgot you have a very early hull. The wood reinforcement there was not added until later production epochs.

Yes, you are correct on the lifting eyes; they are installed much closer to the keel center in the transom reinforced area.

Do you have any idea why the prior owner(s) drilled holes in those two outer locations?

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby opencage » Thu Jan 30, 2020 8:34 pm

They were used for transom straps for the trailer. I removed the zamak $12 seachoice kind they were using.

I’ve seen that folks are still able to use the lifting eyes near the transom notch for this purpose too. I wanna be able to pull a tube too.

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby biggiefl » Fri Jan 31, 2020 10:33 am

Just be careful with these older 13's. The transom design was not the strongest to begin with and hence why they changed it in 1971 for 72 model year. I have seen many crack/separate in the corners. Check to make sure this was not already repaired before you start pulling tubes. My 1st 13' had this happen. I was pulling in the ski line and was like oops, Dad gonna be mad. I think I was 12 or 13.
On my 24th Whaler. Currently in the stable: 86 18' Outrage, 81 13' Sport(original owner), 87 11' Sport, 69 Squall. :roll:

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby opencage » Sun Feb 09, 2020 5:59 pm

biggiefl wrote:Just be careful with these older 13's. The transom design was not the strongest to begin with and hence why they changed it in 1971 for 72 model year. I have seen many crack/separate in the corners. Check to make sure this was not already repaired before you start pulling tubes. My 1st 13' had this happen. I was pulling in the ski line and was like oops, Dad gonna be mad. I think I was 12 or 13.


Thanks for the heads up, I'll be sure to pay attention when I flip it over and work on the cockpit side.

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby opencage » Sun Feb 09, 2020 6:20 pm

Got some more work done this week, re-bonding some delaminated skin, following the West System manual section 5.1: https://www.westsystem.com/wp-content/uploads/Fiberglass-Manual-2015.pdf

First I put down painter's tape for any excess over flow.

IMG_0896a.jpg
FIg. 21. Painter's tape over area to re-bond delaminated skin
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Then I drilled holes, trying to be as strategic as possible to have as few holes as possible while still covering the whole area, thinking about gravity and how some of the epoxy (at ketchup consistency, maybe a bit less) will run down. And filled them using the West System 807 syringe, allowing a bit of time in between shots.

IMG_0909a.jpg
Fig. 22. Injecting holes with 105/205 + 406 using the 807 syringe
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When the cavities seemed filled, I used garbage bags, sand bags, a board, and clamps to keep the skin in place while re-bonding.

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Fig. 23. Sand bags and clamped board to hold skin in place while re-bonding
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Last edited by opencage on Sun Feb 09, 2020 7:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby opencage » Sun Feb 09, 2020 6:27 pm

In the morning I removed everything--and it worked. The spots felt solid and sounded very similar to surrounding un-delaminated areas. There were still some spots on the hull that I repeated the process with.


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Fig. 24. Re-bonded skin
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I also tested a small section of cracks filling with WEST System a mix of resins 105, 205, and 406 at the peanut butter consistency. This mixture seemed to fill in really well and fair. I was surprised it wasn't whiter. I might add their 501 white pigment. I plan on covering it all with white FGCI brush-able gel coat.

IMG_0934a.jpg
Fig. 25. Un-cured 105/205 + 406 at peanut butter consistency filling gaps.
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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby opencage » Mon Feb 10, 2020 10:28 am

I also tried using a plug cutter on some leftover plywood I had and it didn’t work. Just kept flaking/crumbling apart inside the plug cutter bit. I’m going to try to get some better grade plywood and try that, otherwise I think I’ll use a pine dowel for filling in the transom motor mount holes. But it is a cheap plug cutter set from Menards too, that could be it.

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby opencage » Thu Apr 16, 2020 8:43 am

transom_.jpg
Fig. 26. Transom still being filled and shaped using 406 filler for added strength.
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bow_.jpg
Fig. 27. Bow repairs with 406 filler added.
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So much sanding. Andy from BoatWorksToday said fixing up a boat is 90% sanding--man is he right.

All the hull cracks have been ground out and filled with West System 105 resin, 205 fast hardener, and 406 Colloidal Silica filler. The fairing is being done with West System 105 resin, 205 fast hardener, and 410 Microlight filler

I filled holes in the transom with plugs cut from a 2 x 4 and epoxy to keep the grain the right orientation for possible later compression.

Lessons learned:

  1. When wetting out, keep the epoxy as local as possible: overage means extra sanding and sanding stinks.
  2. When filling with epoxy+filler, keep it as local as possible: overage means extra sanding and sanding stinks.
  3. I originally thought that a little overage would help with fairing, but it doesn’t. It’s better to fill, sand as fair as possible, and repeat as necessary. A little extra epoxy wasted but worth it.
  4. Re-building the chine lines where necessary is easier than I thought. It takes a long time and several applications of filler for proper shaping, but it’s not hard to do.
  5. Get a zillion of the little mixing cups, everything is done in small batches, and they can’t be reused forever.
As per all things boat-re-doing, I’m trying to get [the surface finish to be] as fair as possible. I will be applying gel coat resin over it all . Gel coat resin will be thicker than paint and I hope a bit more forgiving; but I’m fairing as if I were going to use a top coat of just paint.

I’ve been doing most everything first in small test steps. That helps a lot in figuring out a technique. I should’ve done more testing with the fairing compound--so much sanding.

I look forward to trying out the brushable gel coat soon.

The cockpit side should go faster with lessons learned and a lot of it being non-skid surface. I will not have as much worry about fairing. But I've been wrong in my time estimates before.
Last edited by opencage on Thu Apr 16, 2020 10:31 am, edited 4 times in total.

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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby opencage » Thu Apr 16, 2020 8:44 am

portsidebeforesanding_.jpg
Fig. 28. Port side before sanding and fairing.
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portsideaftersanding_.jpg
Fig. 29. Port side after sanding and fairing.
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Re: 1963 13-footer Restoration

Postby opencage » Mon Apr 27, 2020 6:00 pm

Sanding continues, I'm getting close to being close to applying the new gelcoat.

In the meantime while sanding and fairing the transom, I removed the drain tube. It was very deteriorated. The outer ring really just popped off with vice grips, then the rest I had to pry out in small pieces using a small flathead screw driver. It certainly needed to be replaced.

I was very happy to see good, relatively clean, dry wood still in there!

I've already ordered the 1” replacement brass tubes and rings per the FAQ: http://continuouswave.com/whaler/reference/FAQ/#Q12
And the $22 flange tool in the recent post from Jim and Phil: viewtopic.php?f=6&t=5368
Attachments
IMG_1184.jpeg
Outer lip removed, rest of tube still needs to be removed. Also, a close-up of gelcoat cracks dremeled out and filled with West System 105+205 with 406 filler, still needs to be faired with 105+205+410.
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IMG_1186.jpeg
Bottom transom wood is still clean and dry
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IMG_1183.jpeg
Pieces of a 57 year old brass drain tube removed from the hull of a 1963 13-footer.
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