Classic Whaler Forum
  Classic Whaler: General
  Web cracks on gel coats

Post New Topic  
profile | register | faq

Author Topic:   Web cracks on gel coats
65whaler posted 02-24-2000 08:08 AM ET (US)   Click Here to See the Profile for 65whaler   Click Here to Email 65whaler  
Greetings,new to this board. Great website!
Just purchased 1965 16'Whaler. Problem is spider web cracks on gel coat. Boat was used as a clammer & has been neglected. Plan to restore fully. Please give advice. Thanks Greg
bigz posted 02-24-2000 09:23 AM ET (US)     Click Here to See the Profile for bigz  Click Here to Email bigz     
Greg,

Might I recommend purchasing The Fiberglass Boat Repair Manual by Allan Vaitses --- the subject is covered in depth plus a pretty good read to boot --- Regards, Thomas

PS Amazon.com has it in stock decent price

jimh posted 02-25-2000 09:37 AM ET (US)     Click Here to See the Profile for jimh  Click Here to Email jimh     
There is good advice on fiberglass repair in the West System booklet:

"Fiberglass Boat Repair & Maintenance--A guide to repair, restore and prolong the life of fiberglass boats with WEST SYSTEMŽ Brand Epoxy."

This is available at most sellers of West products for a modest $3.

You might be interested in reading of my adventures with West System Epoxy at:
http://continuouswave.com/maintenance-logs/epoxy/

--jim

bigz posted 02-26-2000 03:36 PM ET (US)     Click Here to See the Profile for bigz  Click Here to Email bigz     
Greg,

Jim is right, the little West booklet is a great souce and cheap.

However, if the the entire hull has spider cracks one suggestion would be have a shop sand or media blast it smooth and paint it with Awlgrip (US Paints) --- best result is spray and a shop should do it --- new gelcoat will cost you an arm and a leg, very labor intense for a large area like a hull, and usually doesn't come out looking all that good --- a pro job with Awlgrip will lookjust like gelcoat and with care as much as 10 years of service depending of couse on use. As in any refinish work the surface must be properly prepared otherwise as the old saying goes "garbage in and you get garbage out" chuckle-- just my two cents --- Regards, Thomas

AJ posted 03-11-2000 11:43 AM ET (US)     Click Here to See the Profile for AJ  Click Here to Email AJ     
Does any one know the awlgrip color for the inside of a '62 BW? They have 2 colors that are close Sky Blue & Empress Blue. Thanks in advance.
BillS posted 03-13-2000 09:04 AM ET (US)     Click Here to See the Profile for BillS  Click Here to Email BillS     
Empress blue is the one you want.
dfmcintyre posted 03-13-2000 03:41 PM ET (US)     Click Here to See the Profile for dfmcintyre  Click Here to Email dfmcintyre     
If you want a perfect match on the paint, the best way is to take the boat to the store where your buying the paint, and have them "shoot" the spot where there is good paint with their portable machine, which will give the right match.

Best - Don

AJ posted 03-13-2000 04:59 PM ET (US)     Click Here to See the Profile for AJ  Click Here to Email AJ     
Thanks Don,
The only problem with that is the paint store told me that they can't mix Awlgrip.
AJ
bajadude posted 03-27-2000 12:04 AM ET (US)     Click Here to See the Profile for bajadude  Click Here to Email bajadude     
Coating the polyester gelcoat w/ awlgrip is the wrong approach if you want to preserve the integity of your classic Whaler. Re-gelcoat!!! Whaler(before it was sold several times...) used to carry the blue gelcoat. If not, it is available from West Marine. You may have to custom-tint the new gelcoat (add White) owing to oxidation of the original finish, ie the fading... Painting a Whaler is a Major NO-NO!
bajadude posted 03-27-2000 12:08 AM ET (US)     Click Here to See the Profile for bajadude  Click Here to Email bajadude     
BTW it is TOTALLY INADVISABLE to do repairs on a Whaler w/ West System as polyester gelcoat WILL NOT STICK TO THE EPOXY!!
lhg posted 03-27-2000 02:44 PM ET (US)     Click Here to See the Profile for lhg  Click Here to Email lhg     
Is this why Boston Whaler has always said to do repairs with a polyester resin? Jim, I noticed in your hull repair article that Whaler advised you to use polyester resin, but that you purchased epoxy resin. Are we learning something here? Is there a significant difference between the two materials? Also, Baja, why is it bad to "Imron" or "Awlgrip a Whaler hull? Although I would not do it to mine, I have seen quite a few done this way, and am wondering why you feel that way.
bigz posted 03-27-2000 03:40 PM ET (US)     Click Here to See the Profile for bigz  Click Here to Email bigz     
Hi Larry,
Epoxy will adhere very well to a gelcoat in fact if you check out the recommended application techniques for Awlgrip or Imrom it is highly recommended you use an epoxy barrier coat prior to painting which eliminates the possibility of all kinds of problems with the old polyester gelcoat.
In fact if it didn't your hull would sort of have major problems now wouldn't it --- chuckle--

Three professional boat finishers and 2 well versed marine surveyors I know (one of which ran the Silverton production for a number of years) all highly recommend the use of either finish over re-gelcoating a hull today. Granted for small areas fine but for major areas just impractical and for the difference in durability it isn't worth the time or the money.

Gelcoat refinishing is a kin to classic car lacquer painting time time time and more time. Polyurethane 2 part finishes aren't easy and the environment needs to be right that is why unless you follow the directions and understand them it is best to have a professional shop do the work. Neither one is fool proof!

Gelcoat is the best no doubt but other considerations weight into the choice like anything else! So as folks say the bottom line do your research and you have to make the decision --- all the information is available --- Regards Thomas

Zack posted 03-28-2000 11:35 AM ET (US)     Click Here to See the Profile for Zack  Click Here to Email Zack     
Greg, I have just finish refinishing a 1966 Whaler by applying gelcoat. It looks great and I am very proud to have been able to do it right. However, I would agree with some of the other folks, its a lot of work. I spend about 2 hours spraying gel and about 200-300 hours sanding. No matter which way you go, you must fill every crack or you will see it later. Gel is more forgiving that paint and will do a better job of filling. It will also be eaiser to fix any dings you get later. I is truly a labor of love to refinish an old whaler. I plan on posting some pictures of my boat later. Good luck with the job. Zack
jimh posted 03-29-2000 12:26 AM ET (US)     Click Here to See the Profile for jimh  Click Here to Email jimh     
Zack,

Could you please describe how you sprayed the gelcoat? When I bought some gelcoat and opened the can, the stuff was the consistency of peanut butter!

How did you thin it enough to spray it, and how did you spray it--what kind of sprayer, etc.

And did you take any precautions about the overspray and the smell? The odor that accompanied the opening of that quart of gelcoat I bought was so strong that I was afraid to make it airborne!

Thanks,

--jim

BillS posted 03-29-2000 10:10 AM ET (US)     Click Here to See the Profile for BillS  Click Here to Email BillS     
Check out these web sites for gelcoat repair using Duratec's high gloss additive. It makes gelcoat go on like paint when sprayed on large areas (no sanding). It even works great when applied with a brush on small areas. Also check out the link for non-skid floor repair using Gibco FlexMold on the earthlink site, haven't used it yet but I will just as soon as the weather warms up.
http://home.earthlink.net/~shymu/gelcoat.html
http://www.duratec1.com/
If you are looking for other fiberglass repair supplies take a look at http://www.minicraft.com/

Bill

Zack posted 03-29-2000 11:44 AM ET (US)     Click Here to See the Profile for Zack  Click Here to Email Zack     
Jim, you can thin gelcoat with stryne(sp), MEK, or a few other products depending on the temperature and humidity you are working with.

I used my suction air sprayer set at about 40psi. I sprayed inside a building and covered everything I could before spraying. You must use a respritator. After spraying cover the new gelcoat with PVA. You get a lot of orange peel and thats what causes all the sanding.

I put on one very heavy coat, even had a run in a place or two. Then after curing, sanded off the orange peel, then sprayed finish coat, more orange peel to sand off. Then buffed out the finish.

The smell is terrible and you dont want to breath it.

I wish I had known about the duratec, I might have tried it on the finish coat, I was tired of sanding by then.

Zack

ps-it took a little over 1 gallon to refinish the inside of the boat and another 1/2 gallon for the floor.

Kevin Cook posted 03-30-2000 07:21 AM ET (US)     Click Here to See the Profile for Kevin Cook  Click Here to Email Kevin Cook     
I haven't tried any of there products yet but Spectrum Color has gel coat in BW colors.

http://www.spectrumcolor.com/dispoem.asp?oem=BOSTON+WHALER

Post New Topic  Post Reply
Hop to:


Contact Us | RETURN to Classic Whaler Website

Powered by: Ultimate Bulletin Board, Freeware Version 2000
Purchase our Licensed Version- which adds many more features!
© Infopop Corporation (formerly Madrona Park, Inc.), 1998 - 2000.