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Author Topic:   TOOL KIT
compounder posted 12-15-2000 07:27 PM ET (US)   Profile for compounder   Send Email to compounder  
I am in the process of re-organizing my onboard tool kit that stays with my Montauk. I would like to hear from the rest of you as to what you carry, what you consider essential, and what you consider desirable but optional. Trying to maintain a useful assortment of items to remedy most situations without taking up too much space or adding too much weight.

Also, being in a saltwater environment presents the serious challenge of keeping tools rust-free. I have in the past used various oils and rust-preventative agents as well as trying to "waterproof" the containers. I recently heard someone say they used one of the vacuum "shrinkwrap" type machines to wrap and protect infrequently used tools. Any suggestions?

jimh posted 12-15-2000 08:09 PM ET (US)     Profile for jimh  Send Email to jimh     
Essentials for toolkit on a boat:

---Duct Tape
---Needle nose pliers
---Spare spark plugs and plug wrench

I am sure others will contribute additional items to the tool kit.

--jmh

whalertim posted 12-15-2000 08:17 PM ET (US)     Profile for whalertim  Send Email to whalertim     
One thing that I found good to have in your box is an extrs fule line end or fitting. If your fule line has any age on it, say two years or more, it is a good idea to keep a new fitting in your tool box w/ a standard screwdriver to replace it with. Keep the fitting in the package to protect it.
Just my 2 cents
tim / NC
Barry posted 12-15-2000 10:09 PM ET (US)     Profile for Barry  Send Email to Barry     
I carry the following in my Montauk's safety/tool kit:

* flares
* cyalume sticks
* distress flag
* signaling mirror
* emergency blanket (foil type)
* whistle
* extra (handheld) compass
* Leatherman Wave
* duct tape
* electrical tape
* wire ties, wire nuts, hose clamps
* nylon parachute cord
* bungee cords
* spare spark plugs and plug wrench
* spare drain plugs
* prop wrench and spare prop
* small waterproof flashlight and extra AA batteries
* cresent wrench
* channel lock style pliers

In addition, for longer trips I add another tool kit with more tools, WD40, Starting Fluid, sealant, assortment of screws, nuts, bolts, threadlock, etc.
-

Barry posted 12-15-2000 10:13 PM ET (US)     Profile for Barry  Send Email to Barry     
and a roll of toilet paper. ;-)
compounder posted 12-15-2000 11:04 PM ET (US)     Profile for compounder  Send Email to compounder     
Sounds like you're ready for anything Barry!
What is a "Leatherman Wave?"
Thanks,
Joe
compounder posted 12-15-2000 11:05 PM ET (US)     Profile for compounder  Send Email to compounder     
P.S.
Barry, how do you package all of your items?
Also, how and where do you store your spare prop?
Clark Roberts posted 12-16-2000 06:32 AM ET (US)     Profile for Clark Roberts  Send Email to Clark Roberts     
A piece of "weed eater" string about 2 feet long (to unclog the "tattle tale" hole).. and a "box cutter" knife
triblet posted 12-16-2000 10:34 AM ET (US)     Profile for triblet  Send Email to triblet     
Leatherman makes universal tools. Unfold one
way, and they're pliers, another way,
screwdriver, another way, saw, etc.
http://www.leatherman.com/
The Wave is about their biggest and baddest.

West Marine has a decent selection of
stainless steel tools.

Here's what I carry:

SS adjustable end wrench ("Crescent wrench")
SS water pump pliers ("Channel Locks")
SS locking pliers ("Vise Grips")
SS screwdrive with various tips
SS EMT shears
Two different SS Leatherman tools
(actually, one is a Gerber, not Leatherman)
Philips head screwdrive with screw holder
1/4" ratchet
1/4" deep sockets
Allen wrenches
SS Swiss Army knife

Spare fuse for the motor (boat has breakers)
Spare bow light bulb
Spare mast head light bulb
Spare flush plug/teltale
Spare boat keys and car keys (two sets,
different places) on floats.
Electrical tape
Duct tape
Tiewraps
Spare cotter key for prop
Spare hitch pin
Spare boat drain plugs (2)
Dive gear tool kit (I won't go into the
details)
Safety gear (CG required stuff).
First aid kit.
Flashlight (doubles as spare divelight)

All in a piece of Rubbermaid imitation
Tupperware.

When I work on the boat at home, I try to
work out the boat tool box. If I have to
go into the roll cab in the garage for a
tool, I ask myself if this should be in the
boat tool box, and if it should, I buy one,
in SS if available.

Chuck Tribolet


Barry posted 12-16-2000 11:19 AM ET (US)     Profile for Barry  Send Email to Barry     
A Leatherman Wave is a multipurpose-tool. See their site http://www.leatherman.com/default_frame.html for more info.

I have everything except for the prop and the prop wrench in a waterproof box like this one http://www.westmarine.com/cgi-bin/ncommerce3/ProductDisplay?prmenbr=201&prrfnbr=6915&store_num=15&store_name=Cabin%20And%20Galley&subdept_num=957&subdept_name=Containers%20And%20Storage&class_num=987&class_name=Containers,%20Boxes,%20Bins

The prop is just setting on the shelf in the console along with the dry box and my first aid kit.

compounder posted 12-16-2000 12:31 PM ET (US)     Profile for compounder  Send Email to compounder     
Thanks guys. Great info, as usual! I would have overlooked several of the items you mentioned, so I will now add them to the kit.
lhg posted 12-16-2000 03:50 PM ET (US)     Profile for lhg    
I try to keep my ONBOARD tool kit as simple as possible. For over thirty years this has worked for me. A simple Sears black plastic tool box, about 12" long and 5" wide and 2" high goes into the center console. Into this go 2 Phillips head screwdrivers, one small and one medium head, a long shaft, small head blade screwdriver, and a conventional blade screwdriver, a sharp pocket knife, a medium sized adjustable wrench, a good conventional pliers, three fixed wrenches, 7/16, 1/2 & 9/16. and wire cutters. This assortment works for me 99% of the time for general boating, emergency on-the-water work. Which tool do I use the most? - The phillips screwdriver to continually tighten screws around the boat! The tackle box carries tools specifically needed for fishing, when fishing. The car trunk carries tools for the trailer, and a set of sockets, prop wrench etc. not often needed on a daily basis in the boat.

In the tray in my front cooler seat I keep a ziplock bag with assorted electrical items such as all fuse sizes, wire splices and ring terminals, electrical tape and a couple of fuel hose clamps. Also a miniture size can of WD-40. That's it!

Another extremely handy item for a boat is a good (about $100) Swiss Army knife, easily carried in your pocket.

lhg posted 12-16-2000 03:59 PM ET (US)     Profile for lhg    
Chuck made a good point, above, about spare engine keys. My Mercs have a little plastic pouch under the engine hood for the spare starter rope. Into this pouch a put a spare key for the engine, wrapped up in a paper towel. This idea has saved a day of boating more than once, when I left the keys at home! And I always know I have a spare key onboard if I need it.
Chap posted 12-19-2000 10:29 AM ET (US)     Profile for Chap  Send Email to Chap     
I wanted to follow up on lhg's noteworthy post regarding
keys, with a question. This has never happened to me but so far in my boating life I have towed back to the dock 4 boaters who broke their key off in the ignition under various situations, some dangerous. Is there a quick standard remedy to this situation that anybody knows.
Thanks
Chap
Chap posted 12-19-2000 10:30 AM ET (US)     Profile for Chap  Send Email to Chap     
I wanted to follow up on lhg's noteworthy post regarding
keys, with a question. This has never happened to me but so far in my boating life I have towed back to the dock 4 boaters who broke their key off in the ignition under various situations, some dangerous. Is there a quick standard remedy to this situation that anybody knows.
Thanks
Chap
David Reid posted 12-19-2000 05:58 PM ET (US)     Profile for David Reid  Send Email to David Reid     
Ditto the above listed tools, and with all the silt bottom down our way, I also find regular use for a four foot long piece of weed-eater cord for un-plugging the engine "pee hole". Find yourself clogged, run that puppy up the hole far as you can once or twice, and 9 times out of 10 you can restore circulation without raising the lower unit to clean out the screens.
lhg posted 12-19-2000 07:33 PM ET (US)     Profile for lhg    
What is "weed-eater" cord? Sounds like a good idea for keeping the water cooling tell-tale open.

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