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Author Topic:   Model Year Johnson outboard
lizard posted 01-04-2009 11:31 AM ET (US)   Profile for lizard   Send Email to lizard  
I know there is a way to determine the year, based on the following. Can someone explain what the model letters represent. I know it is hp, year, etc.

The info: J10RCSE

Thanks!

Chuck Tribolet posted 01-04-2009 11:51 AM ET (US)     Profile for Chuck Tribolet  Send Email to Chuck Tribolet     
http://www.evinrude-parts.com/evinrude_model_number.html


Chuck

BlueMax posted 01-04-2009 11:59 AM ET (US)     Profile for BlueMax  Send Email to BlueMax     
Lizard,

From the OMC model chart on this site (link below) it looks like it is a Johnson 10HP Rope Start with 15" shaft built in 1980:

http://www.brokeboats.com/omcid.html

No info on what the final 'E' stands for other than model run - whatever that means.

Also, here is a link to a Model Information Reference site for Johnson/Evinrude/Bombardier:

http://web.archive.org/web/20020124182028/http://www.evinrude.com/ docktalk/modref/modelyr.html


Max

BlueMax posted 01-04-2009 12:01 PM ET (US)     Profile for BlueMax  Send Email to BlueMax     
I guess Chuck beat me to it while I was copying the info. Good-to-go.
lizard posted 01-04-2009 01:40 PM ET (US)     Profile for lizard  Send Email to lizard     
It would appear that it is a 1980, rope and ? electric start, COUNTER ROTATION (why would this be on a small outboard and what are the implications?), 15" shaft.

Have I interpreted this right? Can anyone answer the questions above?

Thanks.

BlueMax posted 01-04-2009 01:51 PM ET (US)     Profile for BlueMax  Send Email to BlueMax     
That is interesting. I can understand if it were part of a paired set, whereas the counter-rotation would balance torque and such from the clock-wise rotating blade on the other motor (at least that is how it works in theory on aircraft), but I don't know that an engine that small would be paired with another for a boat?
dbrown posted 01-04-2009 02:59 PM ET (US)     Profile for dbrown    
J= Johnson
10= HP
R= Rope start
CE= 1980
E= Model run (nothing that would concern anyone but the factory)
It is standard rotation and no electric start.
lizard posted 01-04-2009 06:02 PM ET (US)     Profile for lizard  Send Email to lizard     
dbrown- thanks. What is the "S" for?
BlueMax posted 01-04-2009 06:32 PM ET (US)     Profile for BlueMax  Send Email to BlueMax     
Lizard,

Please refer to the links and charts provided in response to your questions - "CS" = 1980 ("CE" was a typo on dbrown's part when duplicating the already provided information on the engine model, showing the specific breakdown as given in the link to the charts you were provided)

The 'E' is a production run designator used by the manufacturer.

lizard posted 01-04-2009 07:08 PM ET (US)     Profile for lizard  Send Email to lizard     
Ahh, it was the typo that got me. OK, now I can follow it.

Thanks for everyone's input.

dbrown posted 01-04-2009 08:59 PM ET (US)     Profile for dbrown    
Thanks BlueMax for the correction. It was indeed a typo error on my part.
Tohsgib posted 01-05-2009 11:21 AM ET (US)     Profile for Tohsgib  Send Email to Tohsgib     
Outside the US they do not really use the 9.9 rating as it is only in the US where it has to be under 10hp for many lakes. Therefore the 9.9 engines are still labeled as a 10hp on their tags. So when you see a J10RCSE it is a 9.9hp.
lizard posted 01-05-2009 09:53 PM ET (US)     Profile for lizard  Send Email to lizard     
Another question- could someone ballpark the weight of this motor? That is, could I theoretically lift this thing, keeping in mind the "chick factor"?

Also, I remember pull-starting my father's ride-on lawn mower (now I am dating myself) and it taking quite a bit to turn it over. How easy is a pull-start like this, if tuned up and in good shape?

Thanks!

Tom W Clark posted 01-05-2009 10:01 PM ET (US)     Profile for Tom W Clark  Send Email to Tom W Clark     
That motor weighs about 75 pounds. It is easy to start.
BlueMax posted 01-06-2009 05:27 AM ET (US)     Profile for BlueMax  Send Email to BlueMax     
Keeping in mind that "Easy" is a relatively subjective term, could the engine be converted to electric start if so desired?
seahorse posted 01-06-2009 07:31 AM ET (US)     Profile for seahorse  Send Email to seahorse     

could the engine be converted to electric start if so desired?


# 173344 is the factoy electric start kit part no. for your motor

BlueMax posted 01-06-2009 07:50 AM ET (US)     Profile for BlueMax  Send Email to BlueMax     
Liz - that might be an option for you to consider (?)

Thanks Seahorse.

lizard posted 01-11-2009 05:28 PM ET (US)     Profile for lizard  Send Email to lizard     
OK, here we go with another- The motor cowling says it is a Johnson Sea Horse 6 hp. The plate on the swivel mount has the following Model #-

6R78B

It is a rope start, with F-N-R. Can someone interpret what the model # is telling me? Neither Chuck's or Blue Max's links seem to specifically answer my question or have this exact model #.

Thanks!

seahorse posted 01-11-2009 07:30 PM ET (US)     Profile for seahorse  Send Email to seahorse     
It is a 1978 6hp with a 15" shaft
lizard posted 01-11-2009 09:46 PM ET (US)     Profile for lizard  Send Email to lizard     
SeaHorse-

can you explain how you figured that out? I checked all 3 links and none had that type of sequencing for a model # or did not have that specific model #.

thanks.

lizard posted 01-11-2009 11:21 PM ET (US)     Profile for lizard  Send Email to lizard     
Read this and my question above-

This motor is supplied in a 15" shaft and has the ability to be converted to a 20" with a $130 part.

I measured the shaft length, from the top of the transom to the cavitation plate, and it is 17". I checked it 3 times. Any thoughts on this? I used the instructions of a small outboard motor website to come to my measurement.

lizard posted 01-11-2009 11:23 PM ET (US)     Profile for lizard  Send Email to lizard     
http://www.smalloutboards.com/shaft.htm

This was my reference. Again, thanks.

Tom W Clark posted 01-11-2009 11:32 PM ET (US)     Profile for Tom W Clark  Send Email to Tom W Clark     
Shaft length is NOT simply a measurement from the AV plate (cavitation plate) to the motor's mounting bracket.

Shaft length is a specification of roughly what height transom the particular motor is designed to fit.

There is variation between manufacturers in what "shaft length" really is and even variation between models within a manufacture's line-up.

In my experience, many small outboards with a 15" short shaft will measure 17-1/2" from AV plate to motor mounting bracket and 20" long shaft models will measure 22-1/2".

Larger outboards will see a smaller difference in this measurement relative to nominal "shaft length".

It is also my experience that Mercury brand outboards will measure less than OMC/BRP and Yamaha outboards.

I have measure 20" long shaft Mercury motors that measured only 19-1/2" from AV plate to motor mounting bracket.

Tom W Clark posted 01-11-2009 11:32 PM ET (US)     Profile for Tom W Clark  Send Email to Tom W Clark     
A 1978 Johnson 6 HP weighs 54 pounds. It is a great motor.
seahorse posted 01-11-2009 11:45 PM ET (US)     Profile for seahorse  Send Email to seahorse     

Lizard wrote:

can you explain how you figured that out? I checked all 3 links and none had that type of sequencing for a model # or did not have that specific model #.


Johnson has only used 3 types of motor identifications since 1922. Until 1969 they used a letter and number configuration, up to '79 they used the hp and last two digits of the year, then in 1980 to present they used the two letters from the word INTRODUCES with the I being 1 and S signifying 0.

Peter posted 01-12-2009 07:48 AM ET (US)     Profile for Peter  Send Email to Peter     
The way that 6 HP motor was made (and all the others that were designed in the 1950s), the motor came with a standard shaft length of 15 inches. It could be converted to 20 inches with a 5 inch extension kit. Unless the 6 was being used as an auxillary motor for a sailboat, the odds are high that the motor has the standard 15 inch shaft length. Whether it has a 15 inch or 20 inch shaft length is easy to see.

That is a nice 2 cylinder 2-stroke. Designed and first sold around the mid 1950s and had a production run of more than 25 years. I would consider it one of OMC's bullet proof designs.

lizard posted 01-12-2009 01:15 PM ET (US)     Profile for lizard  Send Email to lizard     
I picked it up at a yard sale yesterday. I did not test compression before purchasing. The seller said he last had it on the water a year ago- no problems.

He said when it was restarted 2 weeks ago, it did not have a water stream to indicate that the water pump is working, so he shut if off. He seemed like a solid guy so I bought it.

I am taking it today to my friend who is working on my 1985 Johnson V4 90, to determine what it may need, besides water pump/impeller.

It was cosmetically in good shape, apparently primarily used in fresh water (little or no rust). I got it for $150, which according to craiglist postings, seemed like a good deal.

I think it will be an adequate kicker for the Montauk and can double as a motor for my 17 Coleman Marine canoe, I have to check hp rating on the canoe.

Thanks for the input and explanations about earlier model # identifiers.

lizard posted 01-12-2009 09:12 PM ET (US)     Profile for lizard  Send Email to lizard     
It appears, $29 later (impeller and prop seal) to have been a good deal. Everything else appears to be solid and functional. I will deliver the final verdict when it hangs from the transom.

Does anyone have one of those Garelick kicker motor mounts (I don't know if you call them hinged or telescoping to lower the motor for use) that you may be interested in selling for my application?

thanks

lizard posted 01-18-2009 04:29 PM ET (US)     Profile for lizard  Send Email to lizard     
I have posted a WANTED in Marketplace for a kicker motor mount. Please see my posting for details if you have one.

Questions:

1) Is starboard the preferred mounting location?
2) Given that this shaft measures 17" from mounting clamps to the cavitation plate, how deep into the water does the prop need to be to push the boat? That is, from the top of the starboard transom, how much lower will the motor need to drop? If anyone has a photo of a kicker mount on an mid-80's Montauk, I would love to see it.
3) Do you drill through the transom to mount or is clamping adequate? Since it is a Montauk, there is a fair amount of pounding underway.

Thanks.

lizard posted 01-19-2009 01:19 PM ET (US)     Profile for lizard  Send Email to lizard     
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