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Author Topic:   Hull Repair advice needed
SeaGrass posted 09-30-2001 12:06 AM ET (US)   Profile for SeaGrass   Send Email to SeaGrass  
I own a whaler that has been damaged by a poorly fiffed trailer, the keel roller bearing too much load ruptured the hull, not severly but water has entered the hull. How do I make sure most of the water is removed before I make the repair? Would a vacum pump be of use? Also does Whaler use Open or closed cell foam, I'm hoping you guys tell me closed cell. Thanks for any tips or advice on this. I love this little boat and wnt to make sure its repaired properly.
noswah posted 09-30-2001 03:46 AM ET (US)     Profile for noswah  Send Email to noswah     

B/W uses closed cell foam.
OutrageMan posted 09-30-2001 11:53 AM ET (US)     Profile for OutrageMan  Send Email to OutrageMan     
If possible, open the wet area 1-2" bigger than the moisture has penetrated. Allow this to air out for some time. When you are sure it is completely dry, refill with closed cell foam, and sand till flush. Then mix up a batch of West epoxy and wet out a patch piece of 8 oz crawfoot fiberglass over the foam. Make absolutely sure there are no air bubbles. Let cure.

Now mix another batch of West, and this time add enough West 410 Microlite fairing compund until it is as this a peanut butter or slightly thicker (you wont believe how much of this powder you will need to get this consistancy). Using a puttly knife, spread over the new patch and about 1" into the surrounding areas. Let cure.

Now with 80 grit start sanding until the patch is "fair." Now is time for priming and gelcoating/painting.

Remember that 80% of the work will be the prep before the final finish coating. Any consmetic imperfections will be glaringly obvious after the finish coat is dry.

Good luck,
Brian

SeaGrass posted 09-30-2001 09:16 PM ET (US)     Profile for SeaGrass  Send Email to SeaGrass     
Thanks for the help guys, I will probably open the area before winter storage leaving it open all winter, and then make the repair in the Spring. Does the water generaly spread very far from the damaged area? Also on the closed cell foam, does this come in an aerosol can like the cheap stuff that is used for sealing around openings in homes (open cell), or is it purchased as a block and then trimmed to fit the damaged area. I have used West System on other projects, and really like the quality of their products. Again thanks for the assistance, this seems like a great resource of knowledge about Whaler boats.
jimh posted 10-01-2001 07:46 AM ET (US)     Profile for jimh  Send Email to jimh     
The foam that Whaler uses is a two-part mixture that undergoes a huge increase in volume as it becomes a foam. For this reason it is probably not feasible to re-create this process in a repair situation.

I think Whaler suggests using blocks of the foam and cutting it to fit the area needed.

--jimh

waagdiver posted 10-26-2001 11:21 PM ET (US)     Profile for waagdiver  Send Email to waagdiver     
Someone who appears to be in the know described the following type of repair for a whaler hull, which seems to differ from other advise I have heard:

A hull repair needs a solid backer plate to patch the hole over. Most shops want to patch from the outside only, this tends to peal off in a few years. There is not enough stability in the unsupported hull/ patch to work well. The proper repair is to bond a hard piece of laminate to the inside of the hull, approx. 12- 14" larger than the damaged area, usually about .050 thick. This can be done by cutting access though the floor or a technique of inserting the laminate through the hole and drawing it to the inside of the hull with vacume or mechanical means. If your glass shop has not done this before, don't be a test case. If the secondary bond is not good, the injection and expansion of foam will blow out the repair. Don't let them use foam blocks, they will cause a void behind the patch and it will fail in time. Once the backer is secured and foam pressurized, the exterior patch can be done as any normal poly patch.

I have a hull that needs to be repaired, and appears to be in worse shape than the hull of the person that started this thread. I'm getting nervous again! 3 Boston Whaler dealers in Southern California said "any good glass shop" could repair my hull. I'm not so sure. I need some expertise in Central California or Southern California. Help!

waagdiver posted 10-26-2001 11:23 PM ET (US)     Profile for waagdiver  Send Email to waagdiver     
Someone who appears to be in the know described the following type of repair for a whaler hull, which seems to differ from other advise I have heard:

A hull repair needs a solid backer plate to patch the hole over. Most shops want to patch from the outside only, this tends to peal off in a few years. There is not enough stability in the unsupported hull/ patch to work well. The proper repair is to bond a hard piece of laminate to the inside of the hull, approx. 12- 14" larger than the damaged area, usually about .050 thick. This can be done by cutting access though the floor or a technique of inserting the laminate through the hole and drawing it to the inside of the hull with vacume or mechanical means. If your glass shop has not done this before, don't be a test case. If the secondary bond is not good, the injection and expansion of foam will blow out the repair. Don't let them use foam blocks, they will cause a void behind the patch and it will fail in time. Once the backer is secured and foam pressurized, the exterior patch can be done as any normal poly patch.

I have a hull that needs to be repaired, and appears to be in worse shape than the hull of the person that started this thread. I'm getting nervous again! 3 Boston Whaler dealers in Southern California said "any good glass shop" could repair my hull. I'm not so sure. I need some expertise in Central California or Southern California. Help!

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