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  New NANTUCKET Owner: Boating Advice and Docking

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Author Topic:   New NANTUCKET Owner: Boating Advice and Docking
pennstater posted 06-04-2005 12:51 AM ET (US)   Profile for pennstater   Send Email to pennstater  
Greetings to all. After spending hours reading various posts here and learning a ton about whalers, I have just purchased a 2005 Nantucket with 150-HP engine, extended warranty, fishing package, swim platform, and basic factory electronics package w/out the GPS. This is the first boat for our family. We will be using it on the Chesapeake Bay for general recreational use--some fishing, skiing, tubing and general chillin'.

The point of this post? I am hoping folks provide advice or point me to another source of info for first time boat owners. Specifically, I am interested in general boat safety and key to docking.

Thanks in advance for your help!

highanddry posted 06-04-2005 01:28 AM ET (US)     Profile for highanddry  Send Email to highanddry     
Congrats on the Nantucket, we love ours, it is the best 19 footer there is. If the "classic" guys don't like that statement, well, tough, lol. Congrats again.
Sheila posted 06-04-2005 01:29 AM ET (US)     Profile for Sheila  Send Email to Sheila     
Welcome, and congratulations on your new Boston Whaler! I'm sure you'll book many happy family memories aboard her.

For safety information, start at the US Coast Guard Auxiliary's web site:

http://www.cgaux.org/cgauxweb/public/pubframe.htm

You'll find all kinds of information about boating safety and also you can track down a boating safety course. A very fine idea for new boaters. I've certainly benefited from the classes I took. Some courses are available online for folks whose schedules don't permit attending a class. But if you can squeeze a class into your schedule, you'll find it most beneficial.

I'm not the close-quarters maneuvering expert, by a long shot. The best advice I can offer came from our boat's seller:

"Sooner or later you're going to bump something. So the key is to be going slowly enough that when you bump, you don't break anything."

DonD posted 06-04-2005 08:22 AM ET (US)     Profile for DonD  Send Email to DonD     
Hi Folks,

I've been lurking here for a while. I too just bought a new Whaler. I have the 170 Montauk. I traded in my 150 Sport, so I am not new to this great boat.

One site I've found to be helpful regarding general boat information and safety, is the boatsafe.com website.
Here are two great links: http://www.boatsafe.com/nauticalknowhow/boating/
and
http://www.boatsafe.com/

Cheers,

DonD

Sal A posted 06-04-2005 08:50 AM ET (US)     Profile for Sal A  Send Email to Sal A     
Welcome pennstater. I have two sisters who graduated in University Park; it was a great school for me to visit when I was younger!

I, too, have a 190 Nantucket. You can see some pictures here :
http://hometown.aol.com/sarnuk/SalsWhaler.html

The sites alluded to above are great. I would get this book also: The Complete Idiot's Guide To Boating And Sailing. The book is organized, laid out, and explained in an easy manner so that even I could grasp it when I got into boating 3 years ago. Nice section on Docking.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0028621247/102-9642711-6275311?v=glance

In general regarding docking (I have mine slipped in a U-slip):

- make sure all hands of your guests are in the boat, especially the children's hands

-

Sal A posted 06-04-2005 08:55 AM ET (US)     Profile for Sal A  Send Email to Sal A     
Welcome pennstater. I have two sisters who graduated in University Park; it was a great school for me to visit when I was younger!

I, too, have a 190 Nantucket. You can see some pictures here :
http://hometown.aol.com/sarnuk/SalsWhaler.html

The sites alluded to above are great. I would get this book also: The Complete Idiot's Guide To Boating And Sailing. The book is organized, laid out, and explained in an easy manner so that even I could grasp it when I got into boating 3 years ago. Nice section on Docking.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0028621247/102-9642711-6275311?v=glance

In general regarding docking (I have mine slipped in a U-slip):

- make sure all hands of your guests are in the boat, especially the children's hands

- keep cool and calm always.

- go slow

- you can change maneuver by just gently shifting your engine into gear (forward and reverse); never gun it in panic (ie to abruptly stop your direction one eay or another).

- go slow

- have lines and boat hook ready

- go slow

- never be embarassed in heavy current or wind to stop, and start your whole approach over, no matter who is watching.

- practice docking several times on your own before you bring family and guests with you.

- and go slow!

Regards,
Sal

jimh posted 06-04-2005 10:17 AM ET (US)     Profile for jimh  Send Email to jimh     
pennstater--You have made an excellent choice for your first boat. As a result, you will be spared from many problems that befall first-boat owners.

I strongly recommend that you locate a boating organization in your area. The two most highly regarded are the U.S. Power Squadron and the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary. Both of these fine organizations have very strong programs of boater education. They are also typically good fraternal organizations, too, and you will meet many fellow boaters in your area.

Boating is a continual learning experience. I say this with complete honesty: I learn something new every time I go boating! And I have been going out in boats for fifty years!

Docking an outboard power boat like a NANTUCKET can be a challenge, particularly if there are current or wind effects. Obtaining good docking technique will require you to become familiar with how your boat behaves in response to wind, current, and propeller thrust.

The best boat handlers are those who can anticipate what is going to happen next. Plan approaches to docks carefully. Look for wind or current and plan for their effects in your approach. The most important thing: HAVE A PLAN. Get things ready before approaching the dock. Have your lines ready. Have your fenders in place. Will someone be at the dock to take your line? Will someone from the boat jump to the dock? Have this worked out. Will you approach from upwind or downwind? Which side of the dock do you want to lay on, upwind or downwind? Give this some thought before you get into tight quarters and panic situations.

The easiest way to learn is under the guidance of a good boat handler who is also a good instructor. Practice is very important, too. On a calm day in water without current in the middle of the lake, toss something overboard, then practice maneuvering alongside it to retrieve it. It is easier to learn when there are not twenty people watching from a dock.

And, everybody makes a bad docking once in a while. That's why there are rub-rails, fenders, and gouges in gelcoat.

Bulldog posted 06-04-2005 03:57 PM ET (US)     Profile for Bulldog  Send Email to Bulldog     
We all started out as newbies! The most important thing to remember is not about docking, speed, navigation or anything like that, it's that this is supposed to be fun! No matter what happens it doesn't make any sense to get upset with the family or get all bent out of shape about what other people are saying or thinking! The Nantucket is a great boat for the Chesapeake area, we spent Memorial day at Chestertown at a Whaler event it was great. We will come down every year from Pa. to visit............Jack
Sheila posted 06-05-2005 12:11 AM ET (US)     Profile for Sheila  Send Email to Sheila     
Jimh's helpful suggestion about practicing maneuvering brought me to mind of a few threads that I started when we were buying our first Boston Whaler (and first boat, for me) back in November. I've posted the links below--the folks here helped me immensely. Maybe the information in them will help you too.

I had a little victory today. We were launching Winkie, the Menemsha. I was backing out of the launch ramp and it was time to bring her around and move her into forward gear. I'm not as familiar with the controls on this boat as I am with the controls on the Revenge, and I was having trouble slipping her out of neutral. Remember, we were at idle speed, well clear of the ramp dock, and no other boats were nearby. I had to play with the control a bit to get her into forward gear, but I kept an eye on where we were going in the meanwhile and it was never a problem. Once I had her underway in forward, my husband said, "you handled that really well. I was afraid you would panic."

Now, I'm not generally the panicky type, but all the same, those words of praise from my husband made my heart swell.

http://continuouswave.com/ubb/Forum1/HTML/009287.html
http://continuouswave.com/ubb/Forum1/HTML/008595.html

Sheila posted 06-05-2005 12:12 AM ET (US)     Profile for Sheila  Send Email to Sheila     
Correction: I was having trouble slipping her out of reverse.
pennstater posted 06-05-2005 04:06 PM ET (US)     Profile for pennstater  Send Email to pennstater     
Hey guys, thanks for all the direct advice and links.

Sal, funny you suggested that complete idiots guide to boating. I bought it yesterday from Borders before seeing your post.

I look forward to interacting with you all on this site for years to come.

Thanks again!
Pennstater

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