13-footer Cockpit Deck Molded-in Ridges, False Transom, Mildew

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Waffles
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13-footer Cockpit Deck Molded-in Ridges, False Transom, Mildew

Postby Waffles » Fri Sep 16, 2022 6:18 pm

Q1: what is the proper name and function for the molded-in ridges on the cockpit deck of a 13-footer as seen below in Figure 1?

Image
Fig. 1. Unusual ridges in cockpit deck of 13-footer.

Q2: what is the proper name for the false transom at the stern of a 13-footer?

Q3: what cleaning product best removes mildew?

BACKSTORY
I recently bought my first boat, a Boston Whaler 13 Standard. And I’m trying to understand all of its features.

I call the rasised ridges “flutes” because I don’t know what else to call them. They are molded into the deck of the boat just forward of the little hole in the “false transom” that allows water to pass to the drain hole in the “main transom.”
Boston Whaler 13 Standard

jimh
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Location: Michigan, Lower Peninsula
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Re: 13-footer Cockpit Deck Molded-in Ridges, False Transom

Postby jimh » Sat Sep 17, 2022 8:31 am

Waffles wrote:Q1: what is the proper name and function for the molded-in ridges on the cockpit deck of a 13-footer as seen below in Figure 1?
The ridges probably add stiffness. I don’t know what to call them other than raised ridges.

Q4: how old is this particular 13-footer?

I am asking because I suspect this could be a really old boat made from a very early mold. That area could have been a removable hatch at one time in the prototype hull from which the mold was made. Perhaps the hatch was deemed unnecessary, but it was just left there when the production mold was made from the prototype hull about 60-years ago.


Waffles wrote: Q2: what is the proper name for the false transom at the stern of a 13-footer?
The separated area between the transom and the wall or bulkhead forward of the transom is called the engine splash well. The bulkhead or dam creates a barrier to water that is in the stern from flowing forward into the cockpit and creates a well to contain water that splashes over then transom around the engine. The dam or bulkhead that creates the engine splash well is called is the engine splash well dam.

Waffles wrote: Q3: what cleaning product best removes mildew?
Almost any cleaner will remove mildew. Usually a lot of scrubbing is also needed. Mildew comes from freshwater. Mildew loves to grow in the very small depressions in the non-skid surface pattern used by Boston Whaler. Morning dew on the deck surface seems to induce mildew growth very effectively.

I tend to use a mild cleaner like 409 on gel coat surfaces, so as not to be too harsh on the gel coat. Water, 409 or 3M BOAT SOAP, and a bristle brush usually remove mildew for me. To stop from coming back, keep the boat covered so rain and dew don’t get on the decks. Also, a polished and waxed gel coat surface will usually let water run off quickly, and that will help.

F-Hollywood
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Joined: Thu Sep 15, 2022 8:10 pm

Re: 13-footer Cockpit Deck Molded-in Ridges, False Transom, Mildew

Postby F-Hollywood » Sat Sep 17, 2022 6:44 pm

[The deck shown in Figure 1 above on a 13-footer] looks like [the deck on] my boat. My boat’s deck has long-term mildew stains.

I tried a number of [unspecified cleaning methods to remove the long-term mildew stains]. The best [method I tried to remove the mildew was to use] BAR KEEPER’s liquid and a scrub sponge. After that I used a power washer. [This method removed] 95-percent of the long-term mildew spots.

jimh
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Re: 13-footer Cockpit Deck Molded-in Ridges, False Transom, Mildew

Postby jimh » Sat Sep 17, 2022 9:44 pm

If a stain is embedded into the gel coat layer and will not respond to cleaners, then a mild abrasive can be tried to remove the top surface of the gel coat to get rid of the stain. If the abrasive is mixed with a cleaner like oxalic acid, then you can brand it and sell it as BARKEEPER’S FRIEND.

Power washing a fiberglass boat is a good way to force water into the gel coat and laminate. Use a power washer as a last resort. People who bought power washers are always looking for something new to clean with them. I have never met dirt or stain on a well-maintained fiberglass boat that could not be removed with a mild solvent and some hand scrubbing with a soft scrub sponge.