205 Conquest and Drains

A conversation among Whalers
Fishing buddy
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Joined: Mon Dec 10, 2018 11:35 am

205 Conquest and Drains

Postby Fishing buddy » Mon Dec 10, 2018 11:43 am

I own 205 Conquest. I love the 205 CONQUEST, except it takes water [on the deck] in the [aft cockpit] if there are two or more men standing there.

Is [water coming aboard into the aft cockpit of a 205 CONQUEST when two men stand at the stern] normal?

It is strange there are no plugs that could put into [the cockpit drain] holes. For me, that means water should not get in.

My [205 CONQUEST] boat has a Mercury VERADO FOURSTROKE 175-HP, which is heavier than a two-stroke-power-cycle outboard engine.

How is your CONQUEST 205 boat?

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Todd
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Re: 205 Conquest and Drains

Postby Todd » Mon Dec 10, 2018 2:54 pm

Hello--I don't have a Conquest but had a similar problem with my 2003 160 Dauntless. With two passengers sitting in the rear seats, water would come in through the drains and get their feet wet. I believe both boats share the same type of self-bailing system with a black rubber flap called a scupper valve on the outer sides of the transom.

My first attempt to remedy this problem was to take apart the scupper valves and clean the rubber flaps to make sure they sealed well.

I found that did not work fully. I then bought two Danco bathroom sink stoppers from Home Depot. These are simple white rubber stoppers, about $2 each, which insert into the drain holes inside the boat and effectively keep out the water. I only use them when I have passengers sitting in the back of the boat and who care about getting their feet wet, and I take them out when cleaning the deck or storing the boat. Not the most elegant solution, but it does work.

Hope this helps.

Happy Holidays.

Todd

Fishing buddy
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Joined: Mon Dec 10, 2018 11:35 am

Re: 205 Conquest and Drains

Postby Fishing buddy » Tue Dec 11, 2018 2:54 am

Thanks Tod for your reply. During the summer time [having seawater on the aft cockpit deck] is not a big problem, but in early winter [seawater on the aft cockpit deck] makes the [deck] very slippery.

I think I need to try your tip.

To anyone reading this who owns a 205 Conquest or 205 Eastport: does your boat have the same [wet aft deck] problem?

The [cockpit deck] is not high enough above the [hull's] water line, and that is not a good design.

jimh
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Location: Michigan, Lower Peninsula
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Re: 205 Conquest and Drains

Postby jimh » Tue Dec 11, 2018 10:21 am

I doubt that the design of the Boston Whaler 205 EASTPORT (later called 205 CONQUEST) was so badly done that the aft portion of the cockpit deck is always wet on every boat under all circumstances and creates a hazard for crew to slip.

It is possible to create load and trim situations with any boat that will cause cockpit scuppers to admit some water to the cockpit. Conditions that will create a trim on the boat that produces inflow of seawater to the cockpit are usually a combination of a heavy engine, a full full tank, added gear in the stern such as a large cooler, a fish well, larger and heavy batteries, and heavy crew moving to the stern.

As boats become smaller and lighter, the position of gear and crew, the weight of the outboard engine, and the weight of the fuel are all significant percentages of the total boat weight, so these weights and their locations have more influence in smaller boats than in larger ones. For example, if the two crew that stand in the stern weight 250-lbs each, that is 500-lbs of weight moved to the extreme aft of the cockpit. The bare hull weight of a 205 EASTPORT is 2,800-lbs. That means those 500-lbs are about 18-percent of the hull weight. A VERADO engine might weight at least 500-lbs. The combination of two crew and the engine totals 1,000-lbs. That is 36-percent of the hull weight. The fuel capacity of a 205 EASTPORT is 68-gallons. A full tank of gasoline fuel will weigh about 425-lbs, and that is, again, a significant percentage of the hull weight, about 15-percent. Outboard engine, crew, and fuel represent 51-percent of the bare hull weight added.

It should be obvious that adding 51-percent of the bare hull's weight to the stern half of the hull is going to have an effect on the hull trim.

I don't understand why seawater on the cockpit deck in the stern is only slippery in colder weather. I would expect that seawater on the deck would be as slipper in warm weather as in cold weather. Generally the deck of a Boston Whaler boat has a good non-skid pattern, and the presence of some seawater on the deck should not cause the footing to become slippery.

Fitting the cockpit scupper drains with a one-way valve should help to reduce the amount of seawater that can flow back into the cockpit and seems like a workable remedy. I suggest you contact Boston Whaler customer service. Ask them if they have a recommendation for this problem. Perhaps Boston Whaler customer service can suggest a particular type of check valve for the drain that works well with the OEM drain fitting.

Fishing buddy
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Joined: Mon Dec 10, 2018 11:35 am

Re: 205 Conquest and Drains

Postby Fishing buddy » Tue Dec 11, 2018 12:35 pm

Thanks Jimh for your long reply. I appreciate it.

Yes I undestand that if I have full fuel tank, crew standing at the back of the boat and heavy engine the trim on the boat will change. Of course. But I have been in many boats and that is Trophy 2002 won't take any water inside. Trophy 2002 is same size as an [EASTPORT or CONQUEST] 205. The deck is higher than in [EASTPORT or CONQUEST] 205, and I think Trophy 2002 will carry more load than 205 Conquest. Otherwise I think 205 Conquest is much much better boat, and there is no doubt about that.

With cold seawater, when the temperature is below the freezing point (below 0-degree-C) the water will freeze in deck and then it's slippery and dangerous. Been there. Here in Northern Europe it's common that we keep angling until harbours are freezing.

Plugs are good way to handle this problem. Jimh--what kind of one-way valve you mean? Can you give any example pic or any link for the manufacturer?

jimh
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Re: 205 Conquest and Drains

Postby jimh » Tue Dec 11, 2018 1:11 pm

You must be a very avid angler if you are out in air temperatures below freezing. My boating ends when the air temperature gets to about 15-degrees-C, and I am a fair weather boater.

To create a one-way valve for a scupper, there are some flapper-type valves and also some floating ball valves--what we would call a Ping-Pong ball.

Try this presentation;
https://www.boatus.com/magazine/trailering/2013/october/how-to-install-a-one-way-scupper-valve.asp

See this product, too:
http://jeanstreetshipyard.store/boat-self-bailing-cockpit-drain-flapper-transom-scupper-valve-with-gasket-seal/

You can find hundreds of sites with a search on "one-way flapper valve ball valve scupper drain" on a search engine like GOOGLE.

Fishing buddy
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Joined: Mon Dec 10, 2018 11:35 am

Re: 205 Conquest and Drains

Postby Fishing buddy » Wed Dec 12, 2018 12:21 pm

Thanks Jimh. Yes I really am a passionate fisherman. I also keep fishing until harbours gets ice cover because salmon species keeps biting very well in cold water.

Those ball valves looks very clever. I think I need to try it!