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  RACOR Fuel Filter for New Yamaha F70

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Author Topic:   RACOR Fuel Filter for New Yamaha F70
hullinthewater posted 04-07-2014 07:24 PM ET (US)   Profile for hullinthewater   Send Email to hullinthewater  
Waiting for new Yamaha F70AL install on my Super-Tauk and have considered this Racor fuel-water separator filter:

http://us.binnacle.com/Maintenance-Fuel-filters/c50_473/p6526/RACOR-025-RAC-02-25-GPH-INLINE-FUEL-FILTER/product_info.html

Having browsed for the Racor counter part for the standard Yamaha issue (MAR-MINIF-LT-AS)

http://www.simyamaha.com/Yamaha_Fuel_Water_Separating_Filter_Kit_p/mar-minif-lt-as.htm

This is what I find: filter S3213 and Bowl RK30475, but you retain the Yamaha head. Specs for these parts is of 10 micron filtration and flow rate of 60 gph.

Yamaha doesn't publish minumum filter flow rate for the F70, but some tests have indicated a fuel consumption rate as low as 6-GPH. How and when would the F70 ever see near 60-GPH flow rate?

If likely never, then it seems a the more compact and economical fuel/water separator might be this: RACOR 025-RAC-02.

What am I missing here?

jimh posted 04-07-2014 08:23 PM ET (US)     Profile for jimh  Send Email to jimh     
You can roughly figure the fuel flow rate at full throttle in GPH will the HP/10, so a 70-HP engine will probably have about 7-GPH.
hullinthewater posted 04-07-2014 11:27 PM ET (US)     Profile for hullinthewater  Send Email to hullinthewater     
Edit: I mis-stated in the original post.

The test results of the F70 yielded a near 6 mpg efficiency rate, not 6 gph rate.
It was pure fluke that I was remotely close to the 7 gph from JH's formula.

However, reviewing that spec of 7 gph (per JH's formula), it's still less than 10% of the Yamaha specified max flow rate for their recommended filter (60 gph, 10 micron).
A bit of overkill, but then what benefit would I give up in using the Racor 025-02 (35 gph, 10 micron).

Also, the Racor being 2" x 4" is just over half the size of the others- that's a plus in a Montauk splash well.

Again, maybe I'm missing something here.

Peter posted 04-08-2014 06:58 AM ET (US)     Profile for Peter  Send Email to Peter     
You can expect that the Yamaha F70 will consume about 6 to 6.3 GPH at WOT. There is no reason that I can discern why you can't use a more compact lower flow rate rated filter. The difference between a lower flow rated and a higher flow rated filter is the size of the filter and the pore size. For the same pore size, the higher the flow rate, the more filter surface area required so as not to unduly restrict flow.
Jefecinco posted 04-08-2014 10:34 AM ET (US)     Profile for Jefecinco  Send Email to Jefecinco     
If you are going to the trouble and expense to install a Racor filter consider the two micron filter.

Butch

sosmerc posted 04-08-2014 03:44 PM ET (US)     Profile for sosmerc  Send Email to sosmerc     
My guess is that the new Yamaha 70 is already equipped with a quality filter that can be easily inspected. It may even have an electronic sensor that will sound a horn if it detects any water collecting at the bottom of the filter. Why clutter the boat with another filter if it is not necessary?
jharrell posted 04-08-2014 04:31 PM ET (US)     Profile for jharrell    
I can confirm the F70 already has a built in fuel-water separator with sensor. It is described on page 33, 52 and 97 of the manual which can be found here:

http://www.yamaha-motor.com/assets/service/manuals/1/ F70LA_6CJL-1000001~Current_LIT-18626-08-72_1808.pdf

I thought about adding a secondary with multiple taps to feed my kicker as well, but there are no good places to mount one on a Montauk that is not a shin hazard. My kicker uses the same fuel connection as the F70 so I can just move the fuel line over if needed, simplier. Also with on deck fuel tanks and keeping my Montauk in the garage there is not much risk for water contamination. I think I will not add a secondary filter to my setup.

hullinthewater posted 04-09-2014 02:53 AM ET (US)     Profile for hullinthewater  Send Email to hullinthewater     
Jharrell, thanks for the reply. If the factory filter turns out to be sufficient for particulates and water, I'm good with it. I'll look up the manual and talk to the dealer/installers.

Alternately, since this boat will be slipped permanently, chance of tank condensation is higher, so the Racor 025-02 filter installed in the splash well (non-shin banger) might prove to be a good backup.
At least this Racor is small enough to fit a splash well mount, and is made of anodized aluminum with a plastic bowl. Not inexpensive at about $85-90, but the replacement elements are about $15 on fleabay.

Here's a Racor spec sheet:
http://onemarineoffshore.com/uploads/onemarine_products/311.pdf

Peter posted 04-09-2014 06:51 AM ET (US)     Profile for Peter  Send Email to Peter     
How frequently do you expect to use your boat? Unless you plan to use your boat twice a year, I think I would not worry about tank condensation. I've had a boat with a 300 gallon fuel capacity sit for 6 months during the winter and the amount of water caught by the water separating fuel filter over the course of the entire year including the winter layup wouldn't have filled a shot glass.

The only time I had a water-in-fuel problem was when I was the very first boat to take on fuel at the fuel dock for the season. There was water in the pump hose which ended up in one of my tanks and set off the water-in-fuel alarm within 5 minutes of pulling away from the fuel dock.

Jefecinco posted 04-09-2014 10:50 AM ET (US)     Profile for Jefecinco  Send Email to Jefecinco     
If condensate is your concern a two micron Racor filter element is recommended.
hullinthewater posted 04-09-2014 02:02 PM ET (US)     Profile for hullinthewater  Send Email to hullinthewater     
Peter- a valid point, except that Montauk deck tanks are subject to daily heating/cooling cycles.
A 300 gal tank below deck would seem less susceptible to condensation (being covered), and that tank is likely feeding a larger HP motor that might better tolerate such small amounts of water. Just speculating on that though-

Jefe- Yamaha spec's a 10 micron for particulates, but water is separated by the bowl that allows separation by fluid weight difference. Although Racor claims that their elements contain a feature called 'Aqua-Bloc' which is supposed to chemically assist in the water separation. I'm a scientist or petroleum engineer, but I would wager the 'bowl' does most of the work. Of course in the case of this subject Racor, it doesn't hold much water anyway.

I'll follow up with what my dealer/installer recommends.
I think I read a post here in the past about this particular filter being used...

Peter posted 04-09-2014 05:51 PM ET (US)     Profile for Peter  Send Email to Peter     
Given that the tanks in my boat were vented to atmosphere and the motors were drawing fuel typically at a rate of 10 gallons per hour, the flow of moisture rich (probably close to 100 percent humidity) sea level air into the tank provided for plenty of condensation opportunities. The way the boat was constructed with three tanks, I would often leave two of those tanks towards empty (lots of sea level air volume in the tank) for several weeks while running off the main tank. Again more opportunity for condensation. And of course all tanks sat still between weekends. Condensation was never a problem, not even during the Winter.

If you are very concerned about condensation from the diurnal cycle, simply fill your tank up before you put the boat away for the day so there is no air space in the tank to allow it to breathe or to have any significant volume of air in it to condense out water vapor when it heats and cools.

hullinthewater posted 04-13-2014 12:37 PM ET (US)     Profile for hullinthewater  Send Email to hullinthewater     
That's interesting information Peter, but your suggestion isn't practical in this situation. (I know, some would say there isn't much practical about recreational boating, or that having a slipped boat and NOT using marine fuel isn't either.) In this case, the boat is permanently slipped, but I don't like buying fuel from marinas, so I remove the tank and drive to a nearby gas station to refill.
I'm weighing possibility of using two 6-gallon portables to make the tank removal and refills easier.

I discussed with dealer yesterday and he agreed that the Racor is a compatible filter with the F70 and possibly better than the Yamaha Mini-10 micron. A secondary consideration in using this filter is that it would likely reduce the frequency of servicing the motor's built-in, which is not very difficult to do, but appears to be more tedious and time consuming than servicing this contemplated primary Racor.

Peter posted 04-14-2014 08:18 AM ET (US)     Profile for Peter  Send Email to Peter     
In that case the use of 6 gallon portable tanks makes good sense and you can take one or both with you when you are done for the day depending on how much fuel you have used. GAlso, portable tanks usually have a closeable vent so if you leave them on board then close off the vent. I recollect even the 24 gallon above deck tanks had this. Again, based on your expected operation, I would not worry about tank condensation.
DVollrath posted 04-14-2014 04:24 PM ET (US)     Profile for DVollrath  Send Email to DVollrath     
I installed the same Racor filter (025-RAC-02) in my Montauk with a Yamaha F70. I wanted it more for the additional 10 micron filtering than the water separation feature, after suffering 2 blocked injectors.
My rigging bundle loops towards the starboard side of the boat, and I mounted it behind that for protection. Knock on wood, but no problems since installation.

Dennis

hullinthewater posted 04-18-2014 01:51 AM ET (US)     Profile for hullinthewater  Send Email to hullinthewater     
That's interesting Dennis. Can you elaborate on your fuel injection blockages?
What kind of fuel tanks, size, etc., and what's your general location and brand of fuel purchased, etc?

Having the same motor on the same boat, I'm very interested in particulars.

Also, were there any warning signs before injectors clogging?

From what I've read, there is an electronic sensor on the built-in Yamaha filter, but maybe unless you have the 'Command Link' (pricey) instruments (not sure, but even the Multifunction Digital Tach as well) you won't get an output signal or warning message.

Jefecinco posted 04-18-2014 10:59 AM ET (US)     Profile for Jefecinco  Send Email to Jefecinco     
The nice thing about a clear bowl Racor filter is that you can see if there are any contaminants in the filter. Therefore the need of an expensive warning device to detect contaminants is eliminated.

Butch

DVollrath posted 04-18-2014 01:19 PM ET (US)     Profile for DVollrath  Send Email to DVollrath     
My boat is in the San Juan Islands of Washington State. I have 2 Mirax 12 gallon tanks that were new in 2012. I buy gas at local mainland stations, usually Arco in this area. I perhaps made a mistake early on by using generic white teflon tape to seat one of the fittings. I'm not sure if that has contributed to the problem or not.

My F70 owners manual states in 2 places Yamaha's recommendation to install an additional filter in the fuel system:

Pg 18 - "It is recommended that you install a water-separating marine fuel filter assembly (10 micron minimum) between your boat's fuel tank and ourboard motor when using ethanol."

Pg 34 - "TIP: Adding an in-line 10-micron fuel filter has been shown to greatly reduce the chance of fuel contamination problems."

While I am not too concerned about the ethanol aspect due to the use of small on-deck tanks that are regularly cycled, the second (pg. 34) mention does ring more true to me because of my experiences. In the manual, I cannot find any statement of the filtering capability of the under-cowl filter. I'd hope it was 10u, but it's not clear.

The mechanic who did the service stated that the injector orifice was very tiny (presumably a function of the small displacement and relatively high fuel efficiency), and were prone to clogging.

No warning alarm went off when this happened. I believe the warnings only occur when water is detected. The symptoms I experienced were sluggishness when the motor was only running on 3 of 4 cylinders. It really wasn't extremely noticeable, perhaps due to my setup (13" prop) and the fact I seldom run at high speed. One thing I did notice is that it threw the fuel calculations off significantly. My Lowrance HDS-7 was reporting above normal fuel consumption, but when I refilled the tanks it appeared to be much less. I speculate that the engine was reporting 4 cylinders worth of fuel flow when there were only 3 getting through, and that I applied more throttle to get the desired speed.

Still love the setup, by the way.

Dennis

hullinthewater posted 04-18-2014 07:43 PM ET (US)     Profile for hullinthewater  Send Email to hullinthewater     
Dennis- your situation is not much different from mine, except that you have a larger tank; more than likely I will stick w/ two 6 gallon tanks.
Not sure if ethanol content for Washington St. is = or > than California.
In a separate post on a similar topic, I chose not to install the Racor; now, you've got me 're-calculating' that.

The Racor 025-02 is less than $100 and small enough to mount in the splash well, out of the way of shins and lines.

hullinthewater posted 04-18-2014 07:45 PM ET (US)     Profile for hullinthewater  Send Email to hullinthewater     
Also see:
http://continuouswave.com/ubb/Forum3/HTML/020755.html
jimh posted 04-19-2014 03:00 AM ET (US)     Profile for jimh  Send Email to jimh     
DVollrath--that is great information you provided by quoting Yamaha directly on this topic. Many thanks for providing the manufacturer's recommendation.
jharrell posted 04-19-2014 11:20 AM ET (US)     Profile for jharrell    
I have to admit DVollrath has made me reconsider adding a secondary fule filter ahead of the engines. There is no good information on the filter inside the engine, it is listed on the F70 hot sheet as "large" I assume in comparison to earlier designs. I wonder if the built in filter is a 30 micron or 10. The second filter is listed as optional but recommended.

Will be interested to get ideas how other have mounted the secondary filter on the Montauk so it is out of the way.

I also would like to add that I have never seen 7 GPH on at WOT on this engine. So the fuel flow requirements are very low. When cruising in he low 20's I am seeing about 2.5 GPH.

jharrell posted 04-19-2014 11:20 AM ET (US)     Profile for jharrell    
I have to admit DVollrath has made me reconsider adding a secondary fule filter ahead of the engines. There is no good information on the filter inside the engine, it is listed on the F70 hot sheet as "large" I assume in comparison to earlier designs. I wonder if the built in filter is a 30 micron or 10. The second filter is listed as optional but recommended.

Will be interested to get ideas how other have mounted the secondary filter on the Montauk so it is out of the way.

I also would like to add that I have never seen 7 GPH on at WOT on this engine. So the fuel flow requirements are very low. When cruising in he low 20's I am seeing about 2.5 GPH.

Phil T posted 04-20-2014 11:38 AM ET (US)     Profile for Phil T  Send Email to Phil T     
To ascertain the filter element size of the under cowl fuel filter in the F70, contact a dealer or Yamaha Customer Service.

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