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Author Topic:   1995 Force 90-HP
ShenandoahIndian posted 06-20-2014 02:31 PM ET (US)   Profile for ShenandoahIndian   Send Email to ShenandoahIndian  
What will be the dependability, availability of parts, and fuel consumption of a 1995 Mercury Force 90-HP that appears to look like brand spanking new? Thanks in advance for any feedback you can provide.
Binkster posted 06-21-2014 08:49 AM ET (US)     Profile for Binkster  Send Email to Binkster     
They don't cost much to buy, so they don't give you a big return when you sell, but they're good outboards. They are simple to work on, very low tech, and parts are cheap, especially used parts. They give decent fuel economy. My experience with Chrysler outboards (Force) is this: about eight years ago I was looking for an inexpensive racing engine for my antique class F Desilva racing runabout which I planned to run at the AOMCI (Antique Outboard Club) events. Years ago Chrysler outboards built a racing outboard based on their 105 and 135hp powerhead. They were semi successful and were only built for about 4 years. Well I found one in a marine boneyard. The powerhead was toast but the racing lower unit was in good shape. I found on eBay a 75 hp Chrysler outboard (3 cyl). So I bought it and installed the powerhead on the racing lower unit. It ran good, about 62mph, but after a year or so I was looking for more power so I bought a 105 powerhead (4cyl), and installed it in place of the 3 cyl. Chrysler outboards are designed so that the 3,4, and 5 cylinder powerheads are interchangeable. Now I was running 72mph at 6600 rpm, 1100 rpm over the max. The engine held together well, and never gave me any issue. I ran it at the meets for a couple of years, but sold it when my age equalled the speed the boat would run (72). Sorry for the long rant but I think Chrysler got a bad reputation becuase they were sold on Bayliner boats to first time inexperienced boaters who didn't maintain them.
Jeff posted 06-21-2014 10:19 AM ET (US)     Profile for Jeff  Send Email to Jeff     
Mercury did not make the Force outboards. Like Rich stated above, the Force outboards were a carry over and rebadging of the old Chrysler Outboards.

I would never buy any boat with a Force outboard on it and plan to keep it on the transom.

jimh posted 06-22-2014 10:02 AM ET (US)     Profile for jimh  Send Email to jimh     
The FORCE engines are typically two-stroke-power-cycle engines with carburetors. The fuel consumption will be about 1-GPH for every ten horsepower.
Teak Oil posted 06-23-2014 11:24 AM ET (US)     Profile for Teak Oil  Send Email to Teak Oil     
That motor might not even have oil injection or power trim. Look closely. You are on your own finding parts for it, no dealers and they have been out of production for a while. I would avoid it.
skred posted 06-26-2014 12:45 PM ET (US)     Profile for skred  Send Email to skred     
I put a 1992 Force 90 ("by Mercury" on the cowl). on my new 1992 Montauk. I understood that it was a Force motor, produced with Merc electronics and carburetion, and lower unit. It had no oil injection, but I am pretty sure it had trim/tilt. I ran that motor for almost 5 years, and never had a single problem with it. It was actually a little quicker than its all-Mercury equivalent. I would think that Mercury would still be supporting/providing parts for any motor with their name on it - be it in small letters or large.
frontier posted 06-26-2014 02:32 PM ET (US)     Profile for frontier  Send Email to frontier     
Force started life as West Bend - the frying pan company.
They had some excellent motors - in quality and they looked great. Simple and they worked well.
West Bend sold out to Chrysler in the 1960's, who sold out to Mercury Marine. Seems like there was a connection to Bayliner boats also.
I remember some of the last "Force - by Mercury Marine" kicker outboards were even sold at Costco.
Teak Oil posted 06-26-2014 07:21 PM ET (US)     Profile for Teak Oil  Send Email to Teak Oil     
Mercury did not take over Force until the last few years of production. Until then they didn't even have an electronic ignition!

Force was owned by U.S. Marine for over a decade, the same company that owned Bayliner before Brunswick.

Teak Oil posted 06-26-2014 08:07 PM ET (US)     Profile for Teak Oil  Send Email to Teak Oil     
Mercury did not take over Force until the last few years of production. Until then they didn't even have an electronic ignition!

Force was owned by U.S. Marine for over a decade, the same company that owned Bayliner before Brunswick.

6992WHALER posted 06-29-2014 09:59 PM ET (US)     Profile for 6992WHALER  Send Email to 6992WHALER     
Don't do it.

I had a 91 90 HP Force ran great for 21 years.

When it died I could have rebuilt it for about $1000 but it is totally unsupported for parts. You have to go to Ebay and Craig's list and the like to find 20+ year old parts.


Less then a month after my engine died someone bought the lower unit off my force because their lower unit had died and they could not get new parts.

Binkster posted 06-29-2014 10:57 PM ET (US)     Profile for Binkster  Send Email to Binkster     
Here is another thought. The Force outboard is probably worth $700. So buy the rig if you like it for $700 less than what he wants. Run it for a short time to make sure everything works, then remove it from the boat and buy another motor. Part out the Force on Ebay. The motor intact isn't worth much but the parts are. Folks who own Force outboards want to keep them running and folks like yourself are their only source.

rich

ShenandoahIndian posted 07-03-2014 10:31 AM ET (US)     Profile for ShenandoahIndian  Send Email to ShenandoahIndian     
Thanks everyone for the feedback. I checked with two different Mercury service businesses. Both told me that the outboard I am looking at is dependable and very easy to work on. They also said that they can get parts for them BUT they parts are VERY expensive. The boat and motor are like new and the price is ridiculously good on it. The motor is the quietest two stroke engine I've ever heard and runs great. I could purchase another engine if something happened to this one and still do okay. I'm going to think about it a little longer but I feel better making my decision knowing what I may be getting into with the outboard. Again thanks for the feedback.
-Kirk
Binkster posted 07-05-2014 12:43 PM ET (US)     Profile for Binkster  Send Email to Binkster     
I would go for it. I don't think the naysayers here ever owned one. The engine brand got a bad rap becuase they were originally sold on cheap boats to inexperienced boaters who did little or no maintenance. Parts are plentiful on EBay.

rich

6992WHALER posted 07-06-2014 11:51 AM ET (US)     Profile for 6992WHALER  Send Email to 6992WHALER     
If the price is right it might be worth the gamble.
As I said, I had 21 good years out of my Force outboard.

ShenandoahIndian posted 07-07-2014 10:45 AM ET (US)     Profile for ShenandoahIndian  Send Email to ShenandoahIndian     
The official response from Mercury on this 1995 90hp Force outboard:

"Thank you for contacting Mercury Marine Customer Service regarding this 90 HP Mercury, serial number 0EXXXXXX. We appreciate this opportunity to respond to your inquiry.

Some parts for this model are no longer offered from Mercury Marine. Some parts are still available. Look up the outboard here for a general idea of what is available. Marinepartsplus.com

Should you have any other questions or concerns, please feel free to contact our office at 920-929-5040 between the hours of 7:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, central time.

Sincerely,

Mercury Outboard Customer Assistance"

fishroy3 posted 07-15-2014 09:07 PM ET (US)     Profile for fishroy3  Send Email to fishroy3     
May the Force Be With You!
swist posted 07-17-2014 07:42 AM ET (US)     Profile for swist  Send Email to swist     
One thing I remember from the days when Force engines were being actively marketed is they seemed to be physically bigger than the others (OMC, Merc, Yam) of the same HP. If the engines were so simple, why is that? Or was there a lot of empty space under the cowl to make them appear to have more "Force"?
Jeff posted 07-17-2014 01:53 PM ET (US)     Profile for Jeff  Send Email to Jeff     
Simple does not always mean smaller. Cheap (and simple) manufacturing techniques at times leave you with a part that is bulkier than it needs to be.

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