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Author Topic:   Conquest 275 Questions
avid posted 08-20-2002 05:25 PM ET (US)   Profile for avid   Send Email to avid  
Given the proper towing vehicle do you think the Conquest 275 qualifies as a trailer boat? I am talking a ĺ ton pickup built to tow.

Besides a full set of weather curtains what do cold climates Conquest owners do to extend the cruising season? Are there safe and effective ways of heating the cuddy or the bridge while in port or underway? We are trying to compare NW boats like Sea Sport, Osprey and C-Dory to a Whaler. The Conquest is what we want but it can be darn cold on the Pacific in North West despite being dressed warmly. Eventually, we plan on taking trips to Alaska on the Inside Passage; needless to say it will be cold. I have to believe there are quite a few Whalers in the NE which is not know for being warm either. Will the Conquest work for us or should we go with one of the aforementioned boats? TIA

avid

VMG posted 08-20-2002 05:45 PM ET (US)     Profile for VMG  Send Email to VMG     
IMO the Conquest is not something I'd wanna trail as a matter of routine w/ a 3/4 ton truck -- primarily on two counts 1) weight, and 2) beam. Look at the numbers on the Whaler site...yikes.
avid posted 08-20-2002 06:03 PM ET (US)     Profile for avid  Send Email to avid     
I should clarify what I meant by trailerable. Keep it near our house in the winter and tow to Oregon Coast for spring and early summer. Then tow it to Puget Sound for the summer and possibly Southern California in the winter. Yeah, I hadn't really considered the beam but I had worked with the weight.

avid

DaveH posted 08-20-2002 06:24 PM ET (US)     Profile for DaveH  Send Email to DaveH     
Although each state's statutes may vary, in Florida, as well as most states, it is illegal to trailer anything wider than 102" (Ref: 316.515) unless special permits are allowed (Ref: 316.550).

Anything that requires a permit to travel on state roads legally is not, in my opinion, a trailer boat.

avid posted 08-20-2002 06:34 PM ET (US)     Profile for avid  Send Email to avid     
Is there any way to warm up a 255 Conquest? <g>

I have torn my Whaler catalog to shreds but the beam issue hadn't hit me. When we looked at the 255 and 275 last weekend at the Seattle boat show it hadnít occurred to me either. I now see why they refer to the 255 as trailerable and that wording isn't there under the 275. Thanks!

avid

dhlaw posted 08-20-2002 10:07 PM ET (US)     Profile for dhlaw  Send Email to dhlaw     
I trailer my 295 Conquest with my Dodge Ram diesel. The boat and trailer weigh in at 12 thousand pounds and the whole rig looks like a hippo riding a roller skate!! It is not a trailer boat but sometimes it has to be done. I load and launch this monster solo also!!! Needless to say nobody rushes me at the ramp, in fact every one just backs away...hmmm
jimh posted 08-21-2002 12:55 PM ET (US)     Profile for jimh  Send Email to jimh     
With the cockpit enclosed in canvas and windows, you can get pretty warm from the solar gain (greenhouse effect).

A heater would have to be carefully installed. Many fiberglass boats have them. Having large amounts of gasoline aboard could be more of a worry.

I know there are diesel powered mini-furnaces that are often installed on boats, particularly diesel powered ones. The heater can run right off the main fuel tanks!

--jimh

jimh posted 08-21-2002 12:57 PM ET (US)     Profile for jimh  Send Email to jimh     
Also:

If you are overnighting at a marina, a small electric heater can keep the cabin very cozy.

While underway I guess you just have to dress warmly.

dhlaw posted 08-21-2002 10:16 PM ET (US)     Profile for dhlaw  Send Email to dhlaw     
I am not sure if the 275 has the A/C system, but my 295 does and this includes a reverse cycle heater that works very well. This requires that you either be on the shore power or running the generator. I cannot tell you how nice it is to sleep in a boat with climate control.
dogface posted 08-21-2002 10:41 PM ET (US)     Profile for dogface  Send Email to dogface     
I also trailer my 295 Conquest use a V10 Excursion 4x4, I actually like to pull it.
Dave
Monnas Rock posted 08-27-2002 04:08 PM ET (US)     Profile for Monnas Rock  Send Email to Monnas Rock     
Avid,
Whaler may not refer to it as a trailer boat but, given an adequate tow vehicle, there is absolutely no reason not to tow a 275. the hull weighs a little over 6,300 lbs. so, if you don't carry everything you own in it, the whole rig won't weigh over 10,000 lbs.
I believe the beam is 9'7". Ok that's a little over the unpermitted 8'6" limit. I can't vouch for every state but here in the west,(Excluding the peoples republic of California) if you stay off busy metro freeways and avoid the heaviest weekend traffic, no one bothers you.
Even if you do have to get a permit, that's a small inconvienence in exchange for the right boat.
As for heat, come on down to Lake Mead, we've got plenty of it! But seriously... You can't get a factory gen in a 275 but you can get factory reverse cycle air cond. So if a down comforter and your main squeeze isn't enough, your religated to marinas with shore power. Most of the fuel burning units are very effective but not worth the danger tradeoff. The only other alternitive is a Coleman powermate gen on a bracket, hung over the transom, (but only when your at anchor).
Underway, solar & body heat. OR you could take the leap to a 295, then you MIGHT have some towing concerns but you'd sure be comfortable when it's cold out!
Regards,
Gary
DaveH posted 08-28-2002 11:36 AM ET (US)     Profile for DaveH  Send Email to DaveH     
Guys:

I may be wrong (any lawyers out there?) but if you are considered illegal (unpermitted) by state law and you have an accident aren't you are at fault? Why take the chance? Get the proper permits. I know there are vehicles available that are rated to tow the load quite easily, we're talking gross dimensions of the towed vehicle which is quite different.

Monnas Rock posted 08-28-2002 04:17 PM ET (US)     Profile for Monnas Rock  Send Email to Monnas Rock     
I doubt that you are universally or arbitraraly at fault, in an accident, just because your boat is over 8'6" wide but, that's not my point. Don't buy a boat that is less then you want simply because it's over 8'6" wide. If you have the ability to tow it, "Just do It". Permits are nothing more then a minor, revenue generating inconvienence.

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